• New Print, B14-18

    In Art, News, Print on

    Here is a new print. This is the 4th Piezography print.

    For more info about Piezography process see here and here.

    B14-18(print)
    B14-18, size varied, Piezography on archival cotton rag paper, 2016

  • New Print, B17-19

    In Print on

    Here is a third Piezography print.


    B17-19(print)B17-19, size varied, Piezography on archival cotton rag paper, 2016

     

  • New Print, B17-22

    In Print on

    Finally, here is a second Piezography print.

    Making Piezography prints turns out to be much more challenging than I expected.  The subtle differences between an image on a screen and an image on paper are quite large when one actually confronts them.

    I suppose that the difficulty partially comes from the fact that the images are already done on screen.  There is a step of translating in printing them.  As I already mentioned, our computer screen generally has a much wider range of dark and light, but on paper we have a tactile subtlety that can’t be matched with an image on screen, at least not today.  The Piezography printer setup simply has the capability to print with higher resolution than what we see on screen.  Also there must be some fundamental differences in perceiving an image with an artificial light source behind the screen and an actual object reflecting a natural light source.

    As we are all aware, the visual experience on the web truncates part of our perception and renders it somewhat different than the actual experience.  But I guess that’s a topic that should be discussed separately.

    Jon Cone, the developer of Piezography, provides a preview setting for Photoshop which mimics how the image will appear on paper.  The setting is quite useful in the process and I will certainly use it for making new images.

    I can describe the general difference between screen and paper but simply translating it mechanically just doesn’t work as you’d imagine.  It’s like playing the same song with different instruments perhaps.  I want to fully utilize the timbre of the printing method.  And since I am the one who came up with the visual narrative, naturally, I feel the liberty of turning the process into a whole new making process.

    Anyway, I’m very happy with the print.  Hope you like it too.

     

    B17-22 Pi6a2a9ps(actualp)

  • The Recent Paintings will be at Lori Bookstein Fine Arts, NYC

    In Exhibition, News, Painting on

    The next show will be all paintings.  I’m very excited to share the work with you.  The show opens 9/10/2015 at Lori Bookstein Fine Arts.  The opening reception is from 6pm to 8pm.  Everyone is invited!

     

    Press release from Lori Bookstein Fine Art:
    Hiroyuki Hamada: Paintings
    September 10 – October 17, 2015

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art is pleased to announce an exhibition of recent paintings by Hiroyuki Hamada. This is the artist’s third solo-show with the gallery.

    Rigorously painted on paper and then mounted on canvas and board, these paintings maintain the same level of craftsmanship that are characteristic of the artist’s sculptural practice. Executed in a fully realized gray-scale (save one painting in which an icy blue predominates) the paintings utilize a similar mixture of acrylic, charcoal, enamel, graphite and oil that the artist uses to polychrome his sculpture.

    The artist writes of his work:

    It’s been my habit to draw for many years. My sculptures often start from drawings and so do my prints. But it took me twenty years to go back to full-fledged paintings.

    The process of making paintings can be faster (than, for example, the building process of a sculpture) more flexible, and it can allow spontaneous happenings and development of visual narratives, which can lead to a glimpse of depth and the richness of who we really are.

    But I’m also rediscovering how draining and strenuous the process can be. It is the process of dropping all my daily concerns and opening all my antennas to feel beyond my ordinary spheres and gaze back into myself, all the while putting my faith in the mostly fruitless struggle of digging and building toward the rare confrontation with the moment of a resolution.

    It is certainly one of the most meaningful activities for me but it is one of the most challenging acts as well.

    May 29th, 2015

    Hiroyuki Hamada was born in 1968 in Tokyo, Japan. He moved to the United States at the age of 18. Hamada studied at West Liberty State College, WV before receiving his MFA from the University of Maryland. Hamada has been included in numerous exhibitions throughout the United States including his previous exhibitions, Hiroyuki Hamada and Hiroyuki Hamada: Two Sculptures, at Lori Bookstein Fine Art. He was the recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts Grant in 2009 and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 1998. Most recently, Hamada’s work was featured in Tristan Manco’s Raw + Material = Art (Thames & Hudson). The artist lives and works in East Hampton, NY.

    Hiroyuki Hamada: Paintings will be on view from September 10 – October 17, 2015. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, September 10th from 6-8 pm. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10:30 am to 6:00 pm. For additional information and/or visual materials, please contact Joseph Bunge at (212) 750-0949 or by email at joseph@loribooksteinfineart.com.

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art
    138 Tenth Avenue
    New York, NY 10011
    Between 18th and 19th Streets

    Summer Hours: Monday-Friday, 10:30-6:00
    Closed: August 9 – September 9, 2015

    Telephone | 212.750.0949
    Email | info@loribooksteinfineart.com

     

     

  • Print Update

    In News, Print on

    For the past few months, I’ve been working with a print making process called Piezography.  It’s a black and white inkjet printing process developed by Jon Cone of ConeEditions Press.

    Large format Epson ink jet color printers have 6 to 11 ink heads, depending on the models.  They can apply a wide range of colors in addition to black and white tones.  The result is generally accepted as superb.  But Piezography takes it further by replacing all channels with 7 shades of carbon pigment black ink.  This allows the printer to eliminate the need to mimic gray tones by computer generated dot patterns.  Instead, the 7 channels of black apply tightly packed pigments onto the media, creating a more organic, more accurate rendition of black and white tones.  Also, since the result is basically carbon on paper, it can practically outlast most of anything.

    Epson 9880 Piezography

    My initial impression is that the Piezography is particularly good at capturing the air or the subtlety of atmospheric expression in pieces.  Most of my prints with the graphic contrast have come out very well with the regular Epson printing process, however I’ve felt that there is an obvious limitation in expressing this subtle depth, which is particularly obvious in pieces with lighter negative spaces.

    One of the features of Piezography is its emphasis on the accuracy of on-screen digital proofing by insisting on the right tools and settings.  And I was hoping that this would make the making process more efficient by reducing the trial and error process of actually printing.  But the making process  so far has proved that there is just so much I can see on the screen.

    In this regard, I learned an interesting fact during John Cone’s Piezography workshop.  The screen technology has evolved very much away from the digital print making technology.  The latest screen technology, for example, can provide a much wider dynamic range than what we can see on papers.  The intensity of the contrast on bright screens and its seductiveness represent a major aspect of our visual culture today, at least on screens.  Jon Cone called the entire field of inkjet printing “vintage”.  And the gap between the old and new became apparent when we calibrated our screen to show what we actually see on our prints.  The dull, flat images on screens were devoid of the tactile, organic presence of the cotton fibers of the papers or the atmospheric subtlety of various shades of black pigments on them.  It was interesting to recognize that what we find desirable is very much shaped by the technology provided by the industry.

    The same thing has happened in many other fields.  For instance, I believe that the lack of the popular appeal for classical music partly stems from the difficulty of reproducing the subtlety of layered instruments and the wider dynamic range  required to reproduce the full spectrum of the sounds by our playback systems.  It is unfortunate that the tendency persists due to the widely available compressed music file formats and playback systems geared toward those materials, although, technologically speaking, there are great options available for those who choose to appreciate wider varieties of content today.

    Anyway, I’ve struggled with an image for the past couple of months, and finally, I have an image file.

    B14-7 36x49 2

    B14-07, 36″ x 49″

    This particular piece will be framed and shipped to Brooklyn.

    Please email me if you are interested in the print.

     

  • From the Studio

    In From the Studio on

    I came across the following clip recently and it made me think of how things go in my studio.

    During my studio practice a breakthrough can often occur as a totally unpredictable surprise. It is not intuitive at all. I simulate, I speculate, and I try to imagine with my all being. I try to open my heart as wide as I can to feel all I can feel but the moment refuses to be recognized as my labor of love. It lies one step beyond all my intuitive attempts. It’s only given to me as a fact of life I happen to come across: Being at the right place at the right moment. I stand there helplessly in awe of how the elements reveal their mystery.

  • Untitled Painting 008

    In Painting on

    A new painting

     

    Untitled painting 008ps2

    Untitled painting 008, 40″ x 30″, acrylic, charcoal, enamel, graphite and oil, 2015

  • Untitlted Painting 007

    In Painting on

    For the past 20 years or so I’ve always kept paints with colors thinking that I might use them one day.  That’s what happened last week.  I think blue is a sort of unusual color.  It can be so vibrant and beautiful.  But it’s also very common.  It’s the color of the sky.  It’s the color of our planet.  It’s just there no matter what happens to our personal lives or to the collective life of our species.  The association to the depth, the size and the sense of time is sort of scary while it’s also comforting and wonderful.

    Untitled Painting 007ps2950

    Untitled Painting 007, 24″ x 18″, acrylic, charcoal, enamel, graphite and oil, 2015

  • New Website

    In News on

    I’ve procrastinated years rebuilding my website but I finally started to work on it a few weeks ago, which includes learning about WordPress from scratch, finding the original photo files and reprocessing countless images in larger sizes.

    It’s pretty daunting but I’ve come across quite a few nice images that I’ve either forgotten or didn’t notice before.  Here is one from 2009.  #54 and my son Cosmo at Salomon Contemporary in East Hampton.

    And I would like to thank Ed Brandt for tips and suggestions on site building.  Thank you Ed!

     

    #54 with my son from an East Hampton show 2009

  • Good Bye to Bill King

    In Artist, News on

    I’ve been feeling numb and broken over the passing of my friend Bill King.

    The objective reality is that he was a rare human who defied the absurdity and cruelty of our time by relentlessly motivating us to see what we are through playfulness, mystery, wonder, warmth, fragility and strength in his work. He proved to us that it is indeed possible to live with dignity and humanity even in a time like ours. He was 90 years old. Knowing how he was, he probably worked till the very end. Ending of his life should be celebrated as a great achievement.

    But I selfishly wish that he still calls me to say hi, that we still exchange studio visits and chat about how things are.

    Not feeling like saying good bye to him at all.

    Bill, where did you go?

    Bill with his sculpture in his house

    Bill with his sculpture in his house

    Bill with his sculptures in his house

    Bill with his sculpture in his house

    Bill in his house

    Bill in his house

    Bill with his sculptures in his house

    Bill with his sculptures in his house

    Bill in his studio

    Bill in his studio