Exhibition

  • Recollections: Selections from the Permanent Collection at the Guild Hall of East Hampton

    In Art, Exhibition, News on

    One of my pieces is added to a permanent collection at the Guild Hall of East Hampton. The piece will be in a group show titled Recollections: Selections from the Permanent Collection, curated by Jess Frost. It opens on Saturday, October 21 along with two other shows at the venue. The opening is 5-7pm. See you at the opening if you are in the area!

    #45, 2002-05, 25 diameter x 19 inches

    #45, 2002-05, 25 diameter x 19 inches

     

    #45 (detail), 2002-05, 25 diameter x 19 inches

  • University of Maryland Art Gallery show

    In Art, Artist, Exhibition, News, Painting, Sculpture on

    Four of my sculptures and two of my paintings will be in a show at the University of Maryland Art Gallery.  There will be a catalog with my interview as well.

    I’m looking forward to seeing the new paintings with the sculptures.  The show opens on September 6th, 2017 and runs through December 8th, 2017.

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    Untitled painting 011, 60" x 40", acrylic, charcoal, enamel, oil, 2015

    Here is the info from the gallery:

    “The University of Maryland Art Gallery invites you to an evening reception for Laid, Placed, and Arranged. This exhibition explores recent work made by six University of Maryland MFA alumni — Laurel Farrin, Hiroyuki Hamada, Francie Hester, Meg Mitchell, Ellington Robinson, and Wilfredo Valladares — who have gone on to become significant voices in the realm of contemporary art and academia.

    Laid, Placed, and Arranged will be on view September 6-December 8, 2017, and is supported in part by a generous grant from the Maryland State Arts Council. Complimentary table hors d’oeuvres along with a selection of wine, beer, and soft drinks will be served.

    Admission is free and open to the public.

    Opening Reception
    Wednesday, September 6, 2017, 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

    Location
    University of Maryland Art Gallery
    1202 Parren J. Mitchell Art-Sociology Bldg.

    Parking
    After 4:00 p.m. parking is free in Lots JJ2, JJ3, and 1b.
    (At the intersection of Mowatt Lane and Campus Drive.)

    Also On View
    A series of smaller exhibitions — some rotating, others permanent — round out the visitor experience at the Gallery. Make sure to check out In Memoriam: Andy Dunnill and Recent Gifts.”

  • The Recent Paintings will be at Lori Bookstein Fine Arts, NYC

    In Exhibition, News, Painting on

    The next show will be all paintings.  I’m very excited to share the work with you.  The show opens 9/10/2015 at Lori Bookstein Fine Arts.  The opening reception is from 6pm to 8pm.  Everyone is invited!

     

    Press release from Lori Bookstein Fine Art:
    Hiroyuki Hamada: Paintings
    September 10 – October 17, 2015

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art is pleased to announce an exhibition of recent paintings by Hiroyuki Hamada. This is the artist’s third solo-show with the gallery.

    Rigorously painted on paper and then mounted on canvas and board, these paintings maintain the same level of craftsmanship that are characteristic of the artist’s sculptural practice. Executed in a fully realized gray-scale (save one painting in which an icy blue predominates) the paintings utilize a similar mixture of acrylic, charcoal, enamel, graphite and oil that the artist uses to polychrome his sculpture.

    The artist writes of his work:

    It’s been my habit to draw for many years. My sculptures often start from drawings and so do my prints. But it took me twenty years to go back to full-fledged paintings.

    The process of making paintings can be faster (than, for example, the building process of a sculpture) more flexible, and it can allow spontaneous happenings and development of visual narratives, which can lead to a glimpse of depth and the richness of who we really are.

    But I’m also rediscovering how draining and strenuous the process can be. It is the process of dropping all my daily concerns and opening all my antennas to feel beyond my ordinary spheres and gaze back into myself, all the while putting my faith in the mostly fruitless struggle of digging and building toward the rare confrontation with the moment of a resolution.

    It is certainly one of the most meaningful activities for me but it is one of the most challenging acts as well.

    May 29th, 2015

    Hiroyuki Hamada was born in 1968 in Tokyo, Japan. He moved to the United States at the age of 18. Hamada studied at West Liberty State College, WV before receiving his MFA from the University of Maryland. Hamada has been included in numerous exhibitions throughout the United States including his previous exhibitions, Hiroyuki Hamada and Hiroyuki Hamada: Two Sculptures, at Lori Bookstein Fine Art. He was the recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts Grant in 2009 and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 1998. Most recently, Hamada’s work was featured in Tristan Manco’s Raw + Material = Art (Thames & Hudson). The artist lives and works in East Hampton, NY.

    Hiroyuki Hamada: Paintings will be on view from September 10 – October 17, 2015. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, September 10th from 6-8 pm. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10:30 am to 6:00 pm. For additional information and/or visual materials, please contact Joseph Bunge at (212) 750-0949 or by email at joseph@loribooksteinfineart.com.

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art
    138 Tenth Avenue
    New York, NY 10011
    Between 18th and 19th Streets

    Summer Hours: Monday-Friday, 10:30-6:00
    Closed: August 9 – September 9, 2015

    Telephone | 212.750.0949
    Email | info@loribooksteinfineart.com

     

     

  • Images from Off the Block

    In Exhibition, News on

    Thank you so much for those who came to see the show in Southampton.  And thanks to all the people who have worked so hard to make it happen, the show turned out to be splendid.  Here are some images from the show.

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    #74, painted resin, 24 1/2 x 24 1/2 x 57 inches, 2010-13
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    #74, painted resin, 24 1/2 x 24 1/2 x 57 inches, 2010-13
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    #74 (detail), painted resin, 24 1/2 x 24 1/2 x 57 inches, 2010-13
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    #74, painted resin, 24 1/2 x 24 1/2 x 57 inches, 2010-13
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    A piece by Claire Watson, what would the ancestors say, 2013-14, leather gloves, thread, 32 x 48 inches
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    A piece by Claire Watson, what would the ancestors say (detail), 2013-14, leather gloves, thread, 32 x 48 inches
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    #79 with Andreas Rentsch’s X-ray film mural.

    X-Ray by Andreas Rentsch

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    #79 with Andreas Rentsch’s X-ray film mural.X-Ray by Andreas Rentsch
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    #79 with Andreas Rentsch’s X-ray film mural.X-Ray by Andreas Rentsch
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    #79 with Andreas Rentsch’s X-ray film mural.X-Ray by Andreas Rentsch
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    #81, 2011-2013, painted resin, 24 x 54 x 25 inches
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    #81, 2011-2013, painted resin, 24 x 54 x 25 inches
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    #81, 2011-2013, painted resin, 24 x 54 x 25 inches
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    #76, 2011-13, oil, resin, wax and wood, 46″ x 37″ x 31″
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    #76, 2011-13, oil, resin, wax and wood, 46″ x 37″ x 31″
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    #76, 2011-13, oil, resin, wax and wood, 46″ x 37″ x 31″
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    Off the Block
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    An exhibition of work
    by NYFA Fellows curated by NYFA director of program and curator David C. Terry
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    Opening Reception:
    Saturday, June 28, 5:00 PM
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    Exhibition Dates: June 26 – July 20, 2014
    Location: Southampton Center
    25 Jobs Lane, Southampton, NY 11968
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    Gallery Hours: 12:00 -6:00 PM on Thursday, 12:00-8:00 PM Friday and Saturday; 12:00-5:00 PM on Sunday.Participating Artists
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    Hiroyuki Hamada
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    About NYFA
    NYFA’s Artists’ Fellowships, awarded in fifteen different disciplines over a three-year period are $7,000 cash awards made to individual originating artists living and working in the state of New York for unrestricted use. Artists’ Fellowships are not project grants but are intended to fund an artist’s vision or voice, regardless of the level of his or her artistic development.
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    NYFA’s Curatorial Services offer organizations, corporations, and individuals the opportunity to integrate contemporary art into their offices, headquarters, or homes. Over the past forty years, NYFA has established lasting relationships with thousands of visual, literary, and performing artists working in all disciplines and styles. NYFA’s in house curator will help potential collectors forge similar, and equally positive, relationships with current or former Fellows. Whether large or small, permanent or temporary, for a courtyard or office, NYFA’s curators will work with you and your organization to ensure you receive the absolute best work for your space and needs. Please click here for a list of NYFA Curatorial projects. For information contact David Terry at dterry@nyfa.org.
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    New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) was founded in 1971 to empower artists at critical stages in their creative lives. Each year we provide over $1 million in cash grants to individuals and small organizations. Artspire, our fiscal sponsorship program, is the largest and most established in the country and helps artists and organizations raise and manage over $3.5 million annually. Our NYFA Learning programs provide thousands of artists with professional development training and our website, NYFA.org, received over 1.5 million unique visitors last year and has information about more than 9,000 opportunities and resources available to artists in all disciplines.
  • Off the Block

    In Exhibition, News on

    New York Foundation for the Arts is organizing an exhibition with the Southampton Center–the former location of the Parrish Art Museum.  The show opens on 6/26 and the opening reception will be on 6/28.

    I will be showing with Claire Watson and Andreas Rentsh.

    The newly renovated space is GORGEOUS.  I’ve talked with the director Michele Thomson and a board member Siamak Samil.  Both are very excited to establish the venue as a new non-profit center for the arts in the area.  They need your support!  Please come see the show!

    Off The Block:  New York Foundation for the Arts Fellows at Southampton Arts Center

    Hiroyuki Hamada, Andreas Rentsch and Claire Watson

    Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton, NY 11968

    Thursday, June 26 – Sunday, July 20

    Opening reception Saturday, June 28 (5-9pm)

    Exhibition hours:

    • Thursday 12pm-6pm
    • Friday 12pm-8pm
    • Saturday 12pm-8pm
    • Sunday 12pm-5pm

    #81
    #81, 2011-13, oil, resin, and wax, 24″ x 54″ x 25″

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    #79, 2011-13, painted resin, 26″ x 35″ x 20″

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    #74, 2010-13, painted resin, 24 1/2″ x 24″ 1/2 x 57″

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    #76, 2011-13, oil, resin, wax and wood, 46″ x 37″ x 31″

     

     

  • 2014 Whitney Biennial

    In Exhibition, News on

    You go up to the 4th floor, you turn left after getting out of the elevator to look at the description of the show. There, you can see the work which intrigued me the most in the show: A statesmanlike, official looking portrait of President Obama placed high up on the wall. Beneath it, people gather to read the description about the show.

    “Why is he there?” I ask my wife. We are at one of the most prestigious cultural institutions where, at least to me, openness and examinations of possibilities should be encouraged, and the shapes, positions and the contexts of humanity in our lives should be explored without any authoritative boundaries. I was disturbed to see him introducing the show, greeting a few thousand museum goers everyday. For a starter, this president joins a meeting every week with the people from the spy agencies, generals and other officials to discuss who should be assassinated with remote controlled planes. This president engages, without due process, the executions of suspects which include the US citizens and innocent bystanders. The attacks are often aimed at wedding ceremonies, funerals, and they often include “double tapping”, a war crime according to international laws, in which a successive attack is aimed at rescuers, desperate relatives in tears and the brave people who volunteer to help the injured victims. My wife sort of avoids the question saying “I don’t know”. We often get into arguments when I start talking about things of this nature.

    I really hated to ruin the day with a fight. After all, it was my birthday and she came out to pick me up in the city where I was working for a week. It was nice to see her after a week of separation, but I felt the burning anger and sadness thinking about the deaths and the destruction, the words “why is he there?” just dropped out of my mouth. My wife might have rolled her eyes, but that was not unusual. I also forgot about it after 5 seconds. We were back to our fun outing.

    Moving along, looking at art works, I might have taken a picture or two. I thought one of the cardboard sculptures on the wall was nice. My wife complained that she didn’t like anything except for the pots with dinosaurs on them. I wanted to say that some of the works seem to be like blue prints or recipes. They seemed to include instructions or narratives but they didn’t actually create the magical tastes in my mouth, or the profound shock of transformation in my head. But before I could actually open my mouth and say it, we weren’t walking together anymore. I guess I tend to think in a day dreamy manner sometimes, my wife would get mad because I think in my head and I fail to actually say it, resulting in, well, ignoring her without meaning to do so. In short, we were just appreciating the art works in the show.

    Anyway, we moved to the 3rd floor. By that time, however, I was feeling something again. I noticed that I was repeating the words “why was he there?”. The portrait: his piercing eyes, the image of the people swarming beneath him. And I almost forgot to mention this but you could also hear low ominous sound effects coming from a sculpture around the corner adding to the undeniable unsettling feeling. Come to think of it, the placement was sort of odd too, stuck at the corner, sort of too high as if it was calling your attention to bring out the question “why is he there?”

    I had to tell my wife that I had to go back to the 4th floor to see what the portrait was all about. A big mistake, of course. Later I was accused of leaving her wondering in the museum alone. But the question kept repeating in my head “why was he there”. I could not help it.

    This is what the description on the wall said:

    “Many of Dawound Bey’s photographs–including the others on view elsewhere on this floor–reflect on the nature of portraiture. They explore the limits of what the genre can and cannot do, using it to pose complex questions of identity and our relationships to history. Bey’s portait of Barack Obama is, by contrast, an excellent but straightforward example of the genre. It is included here as a tactical move within curator Michelle Grabner’s quasi-pedagogical strategy; Grabner notes that this image can be viewed as “a signifier of both civil unity and political and racial instability, a punctuation of nationalism and hierarchy in a shifting field of artworks that occupy the fourth floor””.

    OK, so the museum does acknowledge the portrait as a “punctuation of nationalism”, and “a signifier of both political and racial instability”. But the president’s portrait, which is positioned to preside over one of the most important cultural events in the city, is also seen as a symbol of “civil unity”.

    And how?

    There is a civil unity based on justice and humanity and a civil unity based on violence and fear.

    The Obama administration has succeeded in rounding up the entire population of the planet under the vast NSA global network. The government is collecting everything we do online and more. They send out bugs to infect our devices to spy. They infiltrate democratic movements to hunt down dissenting voices. They threaten journalists with unjust laws and imprisonment. And as the elected officials talk about peace and democracy, they keep 1000 military bases across the globe with 57% of our taxes going to the defense budget. The US fights numerous covert and overt wars, all of them are offensive and are based on the special interests of the multinational corporations and the giant banks. At home, the police force is militarized. We have 2 million people, mostly minorities and mostly for victimless crimes, incarcerated in domestic prisons, the running of which is out sourced to private corporations, providing virtually free labor for the major US corporations. OK, I’ll stop but my point is that it’s the “civil unity” by the rule of fear.

    There is no word about any of that in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. We may talk about gay rights. We may talk about women’s rights. We may express and explore the boundaries of our culture and our perceptions. But we are unified under the piercing eyes of our commander in chief. Why is he there? Because he is the symbol of our corporate cage. We are free and creative as long as we stay inside of our cage. And the more I see our moral and ethical obligations neglected in our art community by our silence, the brighter the president’s portrait on the 4th floor shines.

    Of course, that is just all in my head. But I fantasize and I’m dying to want to believe that one of the curators of the 2014 Whitney Biennial sees it through. She is compelled to step out of the cage and poses important questions as a responsible human being: Why is he there? Don’t we know what is going on? What is art for? What is culture when our basic values are based on corporate interests? Don’t we care?

    As we left the museum, the entire building seemed to be a giant art monster with President Obama’s portrait as the head and the long line leading out of the door as its tail.

     

     

     

    2014 whitney biannual portrait of the president

  • Tokyo Underground Cardboard Village Paintings

    In Artist, Exhibition, News, Painting, Sculpture on

    This story really moved me.  It happened in the 90s in Japan.  The economic bubble of the 80s had burst and the corporate oriented restructuring and austerity measures gave some people a newly found reality of surviving outside of the corporate routines.  The underground station of Shinjuku, Tokyo was filled with cardboard houses populated by the homeless people.

    It’s a story of young artists who themselves lived on the edge of the corporate cage, relentlessly trying to be true to humanity…

    I came across their website recently and the English translation was missing in the descriptions of their art works which are crucial in telling the story of those artists.  I offered to translate some of them and here is a first set of images which tells about how they got started.

    Photos are by Naoko Sakokawa.

     

     

     

    first
    By Take Junichiro and Takewo Yoshizaki  Location:  the west exit underground plaza (map)

     

    The very first Shinjuku Underground Station West exit Cardboard painting.

    Initially, I wasn’t intending on painting those cardboard houses at the underground corridors at all. I was set to street-paint in Shinjuku, guerrilla style. I walked around Shinjuku with paint cans with “TAKEWO”. But the seemingly open, unrestricted big city didn’t have any place for the guerrilla paint job. We looked and looked but it was all systematic. We just walked around aimlessly with disappointment.

    We just stood around hopelessly. The city was gigantic and oppressive. As we followed the river of people in despair, we came across the village of cardboard houses at the Shinjuku Underground Station West Exit. We stumbled onto one of them, knocking the cardboard door:

    “What do you want?” A large man with a menacing face answered.

    “I’m an artist and I would like to paint on your cardboard house,” I answered.

    “Say what??”

    “Like I said, I would like to paint on your cardboard house.”

    “What!”

    “…”

    “OK, go ahead.”

    That’s how our cardboard house painting got started. We, “TAKEWO” and I, spent all night painting two of the cardboard houses that night. We kept hearing distant sounds of people screaming and shattering glass, and the underground corridor was filled with the police siren and the ambulance siren every once in a while.

    In the summer night, our rebellion was born in the underground of the mega city.

     

    http://cardboard-house-painting.jp/mt/archives/2004/09/post_118.php

     

     

     

    hidarime_600
    By Take Junichiro, Takewo Yoshizaki and Yasuhiro Yamane  Location:  the west exit underground plaza (map)

     

    This piece is considered a representative work of ours that survived the forced removal of homeless people by the city of Tokyo on 1/24/1996. It’s THE Shinjuku Underground Station West Exit cardboard house painting.

    Yamane mentioned the words “Left Eye of Shinjuku”. The image of those words got the three of us started. It was an all night live painting. The battle of us three. It was so intense that we drew some audience.

    Across from the West Exit rotary there is a monument called “An Eye of Shinjuku”. It’s the right eye. And the one we painted is the left one. Makes sense. It’s the pair. The giant eyes had emerged in the Shinjuku underground corridor. The underground became a creature with a soul, baring its teeth against fucking Japan.

    Just in case, I must say that the “Left” of “The Left Eye of Shinjuku” has nothing to do with the left wing. So those middle aged dick-wad lefties dragging around the 60s shouldn’t mix this up with that. We are not piece of shit like you all. By the way, it’s odd but when we finished painting this one, we somehow felt that when this painting is gone, that’ll be the time this village will be gone.

    The Left Eye of Shinjuku which survived the forced removal had prevailed as a symbol of the underground kingdom.

    Then the big fire of February of 1998 came. Soaked in water, the painting was disposed of by the City of Tokyo, and the village has disappeared as well. The Left Eye of Shinjuku really died with the cardboard village.

     

    http://cardboard-house-painting.jp/mt/archives/2004/09/post_117.php

     

     

     

    gorira
    By Take Junichiro  Location:  the west exit underground plaza (map)

     

    A piece made with circles.

    I wished my work to be weirdly “inevitable” to the time and the space, not to be about my personal ideology, my philosophy or my process.

    I drew lots of circles. A circle doesn’t have edges. It’s round, and it looks the same from any angle. And it’s somewhat humorous. I was edgy but I drew lots of circles.

    When we become excessive, we lose the essence. I also wanted my expression to include a healthy dose of looseness and a sense of humor. But that was pretty tough. We often ended up painting with a grabbing-someone-by-the-neck sort of an attitude.

    Myself screaming savagely with a knife in my hand, myself being inclusive with a sense of humor, many thoughts went through my mind.

    But I felt that the experience which transformed me positively the most is when I touched the warmth of humanity.

     

    http://cardboard-house-painting.jp/mt/archives/2004/09/post_110.php

     

     

     

    tumi
    By Take Junichiro  Location:  the west exit underground plaza (map)

     

    This might be a picture when the cardboard village was being removed.

    Far into the picture there is the word “sin” (罪) and to the left, there is the word “no”(無), the piece reads “innocent”(無罪). It was a piece done as a reaction to the not guilty verdict of 1/24/1996 to an activist for protesting against the removal of the cardboard village. Later the verdict was reversed. The activist became the sinner and the city committed a sin of eradicating the cardboard village. A sin is manufactured according to the convenience of the society. The society is made up with individuals. While we fight among each other, we are harming the planet. It might be correct that we are all born sinners.

     

    http://cardboard-house-painting.jp/mt/archives/2004/09/post_104.php


    You can see rest of the 121 paintings at their site.  And here is the introduction to the work by Take Junichiro.

     

  • NYC Show Opens This Week

    In Exhibition, News, Sculpture on

    Please join us for the opening reception on Thursday 10/10/13 6-8pm at Lori Bookstein Fine Art.

    #73, 2011-13, painted resin, 46 x 70 x 25 inches


    #76, , 2010-13, painted resin, 46 x 37 x 31 inches

    Lori Bookstein Press release

    Hiroyuki Hamada

    October 10 – November 9, 2013

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art is pleased to announce an exhibition of recent work by Hiroyuki Hamada. This is the artist’s second solo-show with the gallery.

    Created from layers of plaster, resin and waxes, Hamada transforms raw materials into sculptures with impressive scale and infinite detail. Taken as a whole, the
    volumes he creates vary from simple geometric forms to extremely complicated amalgamations of shaped volumes. However, upon closer inspection, the
    surfaces of the sculptures reveal a myriad of individual cells replete with painted and sculpted pattern. This part-to-the-whole relationship is a theme that runs
    throughout Hamada’s oeuvre, echoing the artist’s own social consciousness and his interest in the way individual contributions effect larger systems.

    Executed with incredible restraint, Hamada limits himself to a neutral palette consisting primarily of black and white [and on occasion, more coppery hues].
    This, along with the absence of descriptive titles – each piece is sequentially numbered as it is completed – gives the sculpture an austere quality that allows
    for the viewer to bring individual significance to the work. Yet this austerity is not a perfect one. It is tinged with a timeworn patina of dented edges and
    scratched surfaces, which imbues the work with wabi-sabi, the Japanese aesthetic in which beauty is imperfect, impermanent and incomplete. While this is not
    a part of his conscious approach, the artist acknowledges its presence, noting that momentariness is “one of the most fundamental truths we have.”

    Hamada’s work often presents itself to the viewer in seemingly opposing dualities: archaic and futuristic, natural and industrial, restrained and effusive. Indeed,
    the sculptures are as familiar as they are foreign, and yet, it is this Heraclitian relationship that drives the artist’s practice. Deeply conscious of the
    omnipresence of social and political issues at large, Hamada explains that within his studio he strives “to find fine balance in elements to see things being
    harmonized, opposing elements coexisting in meaningful ways, richness and warmth being born out of raw materials.”

    Hiroyuki Hamada was born in 1968 in Tokyo, Japan. He moved to the United States at the age of 18. Hamada studied at West Liberty State College, WV before
    receiving his MFA from the University of Maryland. Hamada has been included in numerous exhibitions throughout the United States including his previous
    exhibition, Hiroyuki Hamada: Two Sculptures, at Lori Bookstein Fine Art. He was the recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts Grant in 2009 and the
    Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 1998. Most recently, Hamada’s work was featured in Tristan Manco’s Raw + Material = Art (Thames & Hudson). The artist
    lives and works in East Hampton, NY.

    Hiroyuki Hamada will be on view from October 10 – November 9, 2013. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, October 10th from 6-8 pm.
    Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10:30 am to 6:00 pm. A catalog of this exhibition will be available later this fall. For additional information and/or
    visual materials, please contact Joseph Bunge at (212) 750-0949 or by email at joseph@loribooksteinfineart.com.

     

  • Adam Stennett’s Artist Survival Shack

    In Artist, Exhibition, Installation, Painting, Sculpture on


    Adam Stennett and Rock Hamada

    Last weekend I took my kids to Adam Stennett‘s art project “Artist Survival Shack” in Bridgehampton, NY. Adam is an artist from Brooklyn. After the market crash of 2008, he had to be away from his art a little concentrating on making ends meet. This project marks his first major project in 5 years.

    The past a few years have been a time of contemplation for me as well.  To me, artists explore possibilities of how we can be, how we see things and how our world can be. And we depend on our radars high up in the air beyond our social restrictions, authoritative controls, religious guidances, and so on to see our own visions. We reflect the wider reality that’s in synch with the time beyond our civilization, our domestic habitats, and the corporate cage of the mainstream culture. But I feel that I am in the minority among the artists today.

    I am not saying that we should all be activists or start doing political art but I find it’s so disturbing, for example, that many of us willingly support politicians who colonize other nations, cut our vital social programs in favor of wars, jail whistleblowers to torture, deceive people to pass pro corporate laws, sell our health for profits, imprison people for cheap prison labor, support political assassinations, detain human rights activists…  And there is not enough outrage among us the artists. The ones who are regarded as the finest, the most respected, think nothing of bowing down to the authority, receiving medals of honor from the very culprit of the tragic decisions.

    So when Adam told me about his self-sustaining off-the-grid survival shack for making his art. I immediately understood his intention. To me it is an experiment in detaching the artist from the machine. He collects rain water to bath, to cook and to water his vegetable plants. He gets electricity from the solar panel. He composts everything including his waste to fertilize his plants and to experiment with the native plant growth.

    When he showed me his spud gun and a bow and arrows in his shack, I knew that he was poking fun at our helplessness and desperation against the overwhelming capability of the machine to kill and destroy.

    And when he showed me a piece made with golf balls with corporate logos–Dow chemical, Lockheed Martin, Monsanto, Raytheon, Boeing, Northrop Grumman, GE and etc.–and government agency insignias, I was struck with an image in my head of the players of the deep state discussing the future of the machine.

    So in short, it was really nice encountering another soul struggling to make sense out of our time: Struggling to show us our potential as artists in the sea of the corporate world.

    Also, having my kids around made me realize that his shack is his “fort”. It’s a little safe place with everything he needs. No one interferes. His world is there as he dreams. It’s so great to be an artist.

    Adam will have a solo exhibit showcasing the results of his month long self-sustaining survival project at Glenn Horowitz Bookseller, East Hamton Gallery, opening on 9/7/13. There will be his actual shack with the solar electric equipment, composting kit, painting studio set up, and of course his paintings done during his stay in the shack.


    His outdoor shower set up.  The black tank on the right is heated by the sun and manually
    pumped for bathing.


    His vegetable garden is enriched by the special survival shack fertilizer (a mixture of one part pee and 5 parts water).


    Interior of the Artist Survival Shack


    The study area


    Cosmo Hamada trying the bow and arrow


    Adam showing off his spud gun


    The golf ball piece in progress.  The shack is located on a private land by a golf course for the wealthy.


    Artist Survival Shack!


    Thank you Adam.