Exhibition

  • Wall Sculptures at Freud Monk Gallery

    In Art, Artist, Exhibition, News, Sculpture on

    Freud Monk Gallery is having an online exhibition of wall sculptures which opens on March 1st.  They are showing some of my pieces.

    I’ve been enjoying their Instagram posts and the site has intriguing interviews by the artists in the current show.  Sign up for email notification at their site.  Their page has a link:  @freudmonkgallery

  • Phyllida Barlow at Hauser & Wirth

    In Art, Artist, creative process, Exhibition, Sculpture on

    Each artist has his or her own focus in one’s own visual expression. The paths we pave in pursuing our practices in our studios define our angles, aims and results. While we go separate paths, we also have the ability to share and talk about what we do with our own vocabularies, which are usually exchangeable in our conversations because we go through similar problems in our material reality.

    In a way, we the artists have our own language that allows us to share our most intimate struggle, joy, surprise, sense of accomplishment and so on.

    Such a discussion can engage us deeply regardless of our backgrounds. We get to face each other as artists—as those who attempt to capture the essence of life as mortal humans with limited human capacities.

    How does Phyllida Barlow’s sculpture embrace our perception with such an intense grip? How does she let the materials go so wild, yet manage to come out with a resounding wholeness? I can tell that she has a very different approach than mine. It’s so fascinating that there are so many paths to get to those familiar unknown places to which we strive to arrive somehow.

    Images from Phyllida Barlow exhibition at Hauser & Wirth, 14 Nov – 22 Dec 2018, New York, 22nd Street

  • The Visual Thread

    In Art, Artist, Exhibition, News, Painting, Print, Sculpture on

    Here are some images from The Visual Thread, a group show curated by Lori Bookstein which commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.  

    I’m always intrigued by Kate Clark‘s human animal sculptures.  And Heidi Hahn is one of my favorite painters.  I like how her paintings can be very emotional, yet unmistakably absurd and odd, and all the elements are expressed with a very solid formal visual quality.  I am happy to be in the same show with them.  My work sits next to Sam Messer’s striking piece titled “how beautiful is the tiger who killed me”.   

    Well, I can keep talking about other wonderful artists in the show…

    Left: Kate Clark, Charmed, 2015, varied materials, 72 x 40x 23 inches

    Center:  Heidi Hahn, The Body is Not Essential XII, 2016, oil on canvas, 32 x 36 inches

    Right:  Hiroyuki Hamada, #76, 2011-13, painted resin, 46 x 37 x 31 inches

    Left:  Hiroyuki Hamada, #76, 2011-13, painted resin, 46 x 37 x 31 inches

    Right:  Sam Messer, how beautiful is the tiger who killed me, 2017, oil on canvas, 48 x 60 inches

    You will probably recognize some of the artists in the show.

    #LisaYuskavage
    #EllenAltfest
    #RichardBaker
    #BaileyBobBailey
    #PaulBowen
    #MattBollinger
    #AmyBrener
    #EllenDriscoll
    #KateClark
    #EllenGallagher
    #HeidiHahn
    #HiroyukiHamada
    #SharonHorvath
    #SamMesser
    #ElliottHundley
    #SarahOppenheimer
    #JenniferPacker
    #JaniceRedman
    #JackPierson
    #JacolbySatterwhite
    #KahnandSelesnick
    #DuaneSlick
    #SableElyseSmith
    #JamesEverettStanley
    #TabithaVevers
    #BertYarborough
    You can see more images here:
    The show is up till May 20th at Mills Gallery at Boston Center for the Arts.

     

  • Guild Hall Show Opens Today

    In Art, Artist, Exhibition, News, Print, Sculpture on

    I am very happy about how the show turned out.  The new piece (pictured below) was safely brought into the museum.  It is surrounded by five of my Piezography prints.  Scroll down for some images from the show…

    _DSC249282, 78 x 61 x 26 inches, pigmented resin, 2017-18

    Hiroyuki Hamada: Sculptures and Prints
    February 24, 2018 – March 25, 2018
    Reception: February 25, 2018, 2:00pm- 4:00pm

    Gallery Talk with Hiroyuki Hamada: March 10, 2018 2:00pm

    Guild Hall
    Address: 158 Main Street, East Hampton, NY 11937
    Phone: 631.324.0806

    Click to enlarge

    There are no photos with those IDs or post 5628 does not have any attached images!
  • Recollections: Selections from the Permanent Collection at the Guild Hall of East Hampton

    In Art, Exhibition, News on

    One of my pieces is added to a permanent collection at the Guild Hall of East Hampton. The piece will be in a group show titled Recollections: Selections from the Permanent Collection, curated by Jess Frost. It opens on Saturday, October 21 along with two other shows at the venue. The opening is 5-7pm. See you at the opening if you are in the area!

    #45, 2002-05, 25 diameter x 19 inches

    #45, 2002-05, 25 diameter x 19 inches

     

    #45 (detail), 2002-05, 25 diameter x 19 inches

  • University of Maryland Art Gallery show

    In Art, Artist, Exhibition, News, Painting, Sculpture on

    Four of my sculptures and two of my paintings will be in a show at the University of Maryland Art Gallery.  There will be a catalog with my interview as well.

    I’m looking forward to seeing the new paintings with the sculptures.  The show opens on September 6th, 2017 and runs through December 8th, 2017.

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    Untitled painting 011, 60" x 40", acrylic, charcoal, enamel, oil, 2015

    Here is the info from the gallery:

    “The University of Maryland Art Gallery invites you to an evening reception for Laid, Placed, and Arranged. This exhibition explores recent work made by six University of Maryland MFA alumni — Laurel Farrin, Hiroyuki Hamada, Francie Hester, Meg Mitchell, Ellington Robinson, and Wilfredo Valladares — who have gone on to become significant voices in the realm of contemporary art and academia.

    Laid, Placed, and Arranged will be on view September 6-December 8, 2017, and is supported in part by a generous grant from the Maryland State Arts Council. Complimentary table hors d’oeuvres along with a selection of wine, beer, and soft drinks will be served.

    Admission is free and open to the public.

    Opening Reception
    Wednesday, September 6, 2017, 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

    Location
    University of Maryland Art Gallery
    1202 Parren J. Mitchell Art-Sociology Bldg.

    Parking
    After 4:00 p.m. parking is free in Lots JJ2, JJ3, and 1b.
    (At the intersection of Mowatt Lane and Campus Drive.)

    Also On View
    A series of smaller exhibitions — some rotating, others permanent — round out the visitor experience at the Gallery. Make sure to check out In Memoriam: Andy Dunnill and Recent Gifts.”

  • The Recent Paintings will be at Lori Bookstein Fine Arts, NYC

    In Exhibition, News, Painting on

    The next show will be all paintings.  I’m very excited to share the work with you.  The show opens 9/10/2015 at Lori Bookstein Fine Arts.  The opening reception is from 6pm to 8pm.  Everyone is invited!

     

    Press release from Lori Bookstein Fine Art:
    Hiroyuki Hamada: Paintings
    September 10 – October 17, 2015

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art is pleased to announce an exhibition of recent paintings by Hiroyuki Hamada. This is the artist’s third solo-show with the gallery.

    Rigorously painted on paper and then mounted on canvas and board, these paintings maintain the same level of craftsmanship that are characteristic of the artist’s sculptural practice. Executed in a fully realized gray-scale (save one painting in which an icy blue predominates) the paintings utilize a similar mixture of acrylic, charcoal, enamel, graphite and oil that the artist uses to polychrome his sculpture.

    The artist writes of his work:

    It’s been my habit to draw for many years. My sculptures often start from drawings and so do my prints. But it took me twenty years to go back to full-fledged paintings.

    The process of making paintings can be faster (than, for example, the building process of a sculpture) more flexible, and it can allow spontaneous happenings and development of visual narratives, which can lead to a glimpse of depth and the richness of who we really are.

    But I’m also rediscovering how draining and strenuous the process can be. It is the process of dropping all my daily concerns and opening all my antennas to feel beyond my ordinary spheres and gaze back into myself, all the while putting my faith in the mostly fruitless struggle of digging and building toward the rare confrontation with the moment of a resolution.

    It is certainly one of the most meaningful activities for me but it is one of the most challenging acts as well.

    May 29th, 2015

    Hiroyuki Hamada was born in 1968 in Tokyo, Japan. He moved to the United States at the age of 18. Hamada studied at West Liberty State College, WV before receiving his MFA from the University of Maryland. Hamada has been included in numerous exhibitions throughout the United States including his previous exhibitions, Hiroyuki Hamada and Hiroyuki Hamada: Two Sculptures, at Lori Bookstein Fine Art. He was the recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts Grant in 2009 and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 1998. Most recently, Hamada’s work was featured in Tristan Manco’s Raw + Material = Art (Thames & Hudson). The artist lives and works in East Hampton, NY.

    Hiroyuki Hamada: Paintings will be on view from September 10 – October 17, 2015. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, September 10th from 6-8 pm. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10:30 am to 6:00 pm. For additional information and/or visual materials, please contact Joseph Bunge at (212) 750-0949 or by email at joseph@loribooksteinfineart.com.

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art
    138 Tenth Avenue
    New York, NY 10011
    Between 18th and 19th Streets

    Summer Hours: Monday-Friday, 10:30-6:00
    Closed: August 9 – September 9, 2015

    Telephone | 212.750.0949
    Email | info@loribooksteinfineart.com

     

     

  • Images from Off the Block

    In Exhibition, News on

    Thank you so much for those who came to see the show in Southampton.  And thanks to all the people who have worked so hard to make it happen, the show turned out to be splendid.  Here are some images from the show.

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    #74, painted resin, 24 1/2 x 24 1/2 x 57 inches, 2010-13
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    #74, painted resin, 24 1/2 x 24 1/2 x 57 inches, 2010-13
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    #74 (detail), painted resin, 24 1/2 x 24 1/2 x 57 inches, 2010-13
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    #74, painted resin, 24 1/2 x 24 1/2 x 57 inches, 2010-13
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    A piece by Claire Watson, what would the ancestors say, 2013-14, leather gloves, thread, 32 x 48 inches
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    A piece by Claire Watson, what would the ancestors say (detail), 2013-14, leather gloves, thread, 32 x 48 inches
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    #79 with Andreas Rentsch’s X-ray film mural.

    X-Ray by Andreas Rentsch

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    #79 with Andreas Rentsch’s X-ray film mural.X-Ray by Andreas Rentsch
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    #79 with Andreas Rentsch’s X-ray film mural.X-Ray by Andreas Rentsch
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    #79 with Andreas Rentsch’s X-ray film mural.X-Ray by Andreas Rentsch
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    #81, 2011-2013, painted resin, 24 x 54 x 25 inches
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    #81, 2011-2013, painted resin, 24 x 54 x 25 inches
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    #81, 2011-2013, painted resin, 24 x 54 x 25 inches
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    #76, 2011-13, oil, resin, wax and wood, 46″ x 37″ x 31″
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    #76, 2011-13, oil, resin, wax and wood, 46″ x 37″ x 31″
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    #76, 2011-13, oil, resin, wax and wood, 46″ x 37″ x 31″
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    Off the Block
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    An exhibition of work
    by NYFA Fellows curated by NYFA director of program and curator David C. Terry
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    Opening Reception:
    Saturday, June 28, 5:00 PM
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    Exhibition Dates: June 26 – July 20, 2014
    Location: Southampton Center
    25 Jobs Lane, Southampton, NY 11968
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    Gallery Hours: 12:00 -6:00 PM on Thursday, 12:00-8:00 PM Friday and Saturday; 12:00-5:00 PM on Sunday.Participating Artists
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    Hiroyuki Hamada
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    About NYFA
    NYFA’s Artists’ Fellowships, awarded in fifteen different disciplines over a three-year period are $7,000 cash awards made to individual originating artists living and working in the state of New York for unrestricted use. Artists’ Fellowships are not project grants but are intended to fund an artist’s vision or voice, regardless of the level of his or her artistic development.
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    NYFA’s Curatorial Services offer organizations, corporations, and individuals the opportunity to integrate contemporary art into their offices, headquarters, or homes. Over the past forty years, NYFA has established lasting relationships with thousands of visual, literary, and performing artists working in all disciplines and styles. NYFA’s in house curator will help potential collectors forge similar, and equally positive, relationships with current or former Fellows. Whether large or small, permanent or temporary, for a courtyard or office, NYFA’s curators will work with you and your organization to ensure you receive the absolute best work for your space and needs. Please click here for a list of NYFA Curatorial projects. For information contact David Terry at dterry@nyfa.org.
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    New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) was founded in 1971 to empower artists at critical stages in their creative lives. Each year we provide over $1 million in cash grants to individuals and small organizations. Artspire, our fiscal sponsorship program, is the largest and most established in the country and helps artists and organizations raise and manage over $3.5 million annually. Our NYFA Learning programs provide thousands of artists with professional development training and our website, NYFA.org, received over 1.5 million unique visitors last year and has information about more than 9,000 opportunities and resources available to artists in all disciplines.
  • Off the Block

    In Exhibition, News on

    New York Foundation for the Arts is organizing an exhibition with the Southampton Center–the former location of the Parrish Art Museum.  The show opens on 6/26 and the opening reception will be on 6/28.

    I will be showing with Claire Watson and Andreas Rentsh.

    The newly renovated space is GORGEOUS.  I’ve talked with the director Michele Thomson and a board member Siamak Samil.  Both are very excited to establish the venue as a new non-profit center for the arts in the area.  They need your support!  Please come see the show!

    Off The Block:  New York Foundation for the Arts Fellows at Southampton Arts Center

    Hiroyuki Hamada, Andreas Rentsch and Claire Watson

    Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton, NY 11968

    Thursday, June 26 – Sunday, July 20

    Opening reception Saturday, June 28 (5-9pm)

    Exhibition hours:

    • Thursday 12pm-6pm
    • Friday 12pm-8pm
    • Saturday 12pm-8pm
    • Sunday 12pm-5pm

    #81
    #81, 2011-13, oil, resin, and wax, 24″ x 54″ x 25″

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    #79, 2011-13, painted resin, 26″ x 35″ x 20″

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    #74, 2010-13, painted resin, 24 1/2″ x 24″ 1/2 x 57″

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    #76, 2011-13, oil, resin, wax and wood, 46″ x 37″ x 31″

     

     

  • 2014 Whitney Biennial

    In Exhibition, News on

    You go up to the 4th floor, you turn left after getting out of the elevator to look at the description of the show. There, you can see the work which intrigued me the most in the show: A statesmanlike, official looking portrait of President Obama placed high up on the wall. Beneath it, people gather to read the description about the show.

    “Why is he there?” I ask my wife. We are at one of the most prestigious cultural institutions where, at least to me, openness and examinations of possibilities should be encouraged, and the shapes, positions and the contexts of humanity in our lives should be explored without any authoritative boundaries. I was disturbed to see him introducing the show, greeting a few thousand museum goers everyday. For a starter, this president joins a meeting every week with the people from the spy agencies, generals and other officials to discuss who should be assassinated with remote controlled planes. This president engages, without due process, the executions of suspects which include the US citizens and innocent bystanders. The attacks are often aimed at wedding ceremonies, funerals, and they often include “double tapping”, a war crime according to international laws, in which a successive attack is aimed at rescuers, desperate relatives in tears and the brave people who volunteer to help the injured victims. My wife sort of avoids the question saying “I don’t know”. We often get into arguments when I start talking about things of this nature.

    I really hated to ruin the day with a fight. After all, it was my birthday and she came out to pick me up in the city where I was working for a week. It was nice to see her after a week of separation, but I felt the burning anger and sadness thinking about the deaths and the destruction, the words “why is he there?” just dropped out of my mouth. My wife might have rolled her eyes, but that was not unusual. I also forgot about it after 5 seconds. We were back to our fun outing.

    Moving along, looking at art works, I might have taken a picture or two. I thought one of the cardboard sculptures on the wall was nice. My wife complained that she didn’t like anything except for the pots with dinosaurs on them. I wanted to say that some of the works seem to be like blue prints or recipes. They seemed to include instructions or narratives but they didn’t actually create the magical tastes in my mouth, or the profound shock of transformation in my head. But before I could actually open my mouth and say it, we weren’t walking together anymore. I guess I tend to think in a day dreamy manner sometimes, my wife would get mad because I think in my head and I fail to actually say it, resulting in, well, ignoring her without meaning to do so. In short, we were just appreciating the art works in the show.

    Anyway, we moved to the 3rd floor. By that time, however, I was feeling something again. I noticed that I was repeating the words “why was he there?”. The portrait: his piercing eyes, the image of the people swarming beneath him. And I almost forgot to mention this but you could also hear low ominous sound effects coming from a sculpture around the corner adding to the undeniable unsettling feeling. Come to think of it, the placement was sort of odd too, stuck at the corner, sort of too high as if it was calling your attention to bring out the question “why is he there?”

    I had to tell my wife that I had to go back to the 4th floor to see what the portrait was all about. A big mistake, of course. Later I was accused of leaving her wondering in the museum alone. But the question kept repeating in my head “why was he there”. I could not help it.

    This is what the description on the wall said:

    “Many of Dawound Bey’s photographs–including the others on view elsewhere on this floor–reflect on the nature of portraiture. They explore the limits of what the genre can and cannot do, using it to pose complex questions of identity and our relationships to history. Bey’s portait of Barack Obama is, by contrast, an excellent but straightforward example of the genre. It is included here as a tactical move within curator Michelle Grabner’s quasi-pedagogical strategy; Grabner notes that this image can be viewed as “a signifier of both civil unity and political and racial instability, a punctuation of nationalism and hierarchy in a shifting field of artworks that occupy the fourth floor””.

    OK, so the museum does acknowledge the portrait as a “punctuation of nationalism”, and “a signifier of both political and racial instability”. But the president’s portrait, which is positioned to preside over one of the most important cultural events in the city, is also seen as a symbol of “civil unity”.

    And how?

    There is a civil unity based on justice and humanity and a civil unity based on violence and fear.

    The Obama administration has succeeded in rounding up the entire population of the planet under the vast NSA global network. The government is collecting everything we do online and more. They send out bugs to infect our devices to spy. They infiltrate democratic movements to hunt down dissenting voices. They threaten journalists with unjust laws and imprisonment. And as the elected officials talk about peace and democracy, they keep 1000 military bases across the globe with 57% of our taxes going to the defense budget. The US fights numerous covert and overt wars, all of them are offensive and are based on the special interests of the multinational corporations and the giant banks. At home, the police force is militarized. We have 2 million people, mostly minorities and mostly for victimless crimes, incarcerated in domestic prisons, the running of which is out sourced to private corporations, providing virtually free labor for the major US corporations. OK, I’ll stop but my point is that it’s the “civil unity” by the rule of fear.

    There is no word about any of that in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. We may talk about gay rights. We may talk about women’s rights. We may express and explore the boundaries of our culture and our perceptions. But we are unified under the piercing eyes of our commander in chief. Why is he there? Because he is the symbol of our corporate cage. We are free and creative as long as we stay inside of our cage. And the more I see our moral and ethical obligations neglected in our art community by our silence, the brighter the president’s portrait on the 4th floor shines.

    Of course, that is just all in my head. But I fantasize and I’m dying to want to believe that one of the curators of the 2014 Whitney Biennial sees it through. She is compelled to step out of the cage and poses important questions as a responsible human being: Why is he there? Don’t we know what is going on? What is art for? What is culture when our basic values are based on corporate interests? Don’t we care?

    As we left the museum, the entire building seemed to be a giant art monster with President Obama’s portrait as the head and the long line leading out of the door as its tail.

     

     

     

    2014 whitney biannual portrait of the president