From the Studio

  • Gorky’s Granddaughter: Hiroyuki Hamada, April 2018

    I had a wonderful studio visit by Zachary Keeting and Christopher Joy from Gorky’s Granddaughter a few weeks ago. They captured it nicely for you to see it as well.

  • What Do We the Artists do?

    In Art, From the Studio, News, Sculpture on

    I made this piece around the year 2000. Things were much simpler for me back then. The only thing that guided me was the momentum of my studio practice–like an explorer, I searched, was mesmerized and was content with newly found visual-scapes. The world–the human world–seemed like an extension of the great oceans and lands with its harmony and order. If I did have to justify my motive, perhaps I felt responsible for the path that saved my life from self-destructive anger and sadness. I didn’t feel the responsibilities arising from being a parent, a grown-up, an artist and a human back then. But the pain of life that squeezed my young self never really went away.

    What it is to live? When one decides to be a constructive force for our species, for our fellow creatures and for the environment, what can artists do? When our efforts are harvested to decorate power and authority, and when our efforts are used as currency to protect the hierarchy of money and violence, how do we assert our roles to be human and to show what it is to be human?

    Getting back to the piece, shortly after it was made, I gave it to my wife in exchange for her grandmother’s ring, which she loved. In turn, I gave the ring to her as a wedding ring. The piece has been put away for a while, but my wife wanted to see it next to one of my new pieces, so here they are.

    _DSC2703ps#83 (left) and #30 (right)

    #83, 33 x 24 x 3 inches, found object and resin, 2014-18

    #30, 18″ diameter x 8″, enamel, plaster, resin, tar and wax, 2000

    _DSC2706ps

    _DSC2704ps _DSC2705ps

     

  • From the Studio

    In From the Studio on

    I came across the following clip recently and it made me think of how things go in my studio.

    During my studio practice a breakthrough can often occur as a totally unpredictable surprise. It is not intuitive at all. I simulate, I speculate, and I try to imagine with my all being. I try to open my heart as wide as I can to feel all I can feel but the moment refuses to be recognized as my labor of love. It lies one step beyond all my intuitive attempts. It’s only given to me as a fact of life I happen to come across: Being at the right place at the right moment. I stand there helplessly in awe of how the elements reveal their mystery.

tranh theu tay tại TP HCM