Posts tagged with ‘Hiroyuki Hamada’

  • B14-08

    In News, Print on

    A new print

     

     

    B14-08 4test950

  • B18-05

    In News, Print on

    A new print

     

     

    B18-05 6 950

  • Pechakucha Night Hamptons Video

    In News on

    Here is a clip of a short talk I did about making sculpture last year.

    Thank you Andrea Grover and Parrish Art Museum for putting it together.

     

     

    Transcript:

    Thank you for inviting me today. I would like to talk about making sculptures. The first step is to come up with the basic idea for it. This is a tricky process because I am interested in an experience without words, stories or symbols. What I am interested in is to make you feel like you belong to the vast universe that is within the tiny cells we are made of reaching out to the edge of the space out there. It can be a scary feeling. You are all alone just floating in the unknown vastness. You might be stuck with something you don’t understand. Or you might feel like you are nothing. You might be lonely and afraid. But I believe good art can let you feel the vastness and the mystery without the fear. It welcomes you with open arms. And remind you that you belong to that reality. It can be a moment when you look at a painting you love. Or it can last for a whole song when you listen to a great song. Or it can last for a whole chapter of a book. What it does is that it can become a bridge between that part of you and you buried in our everyday life. It gives us the courage to go on and it gives us the courage to embrace the unknown with curiosity and excitement.

    Making process is a weird thing. You open yourself in certain ways at the same time you let go of other things. It’s not like solving a math problem where you add a fixed number to a fixed number for instance. Most of the time you can’t even see all the numbers you are adding. And the missing numbers can only be seen with your heart and soul. For an average man in mid 40s, jaded, cynical and disillusioned, it is not easy. As soon as I think I caught something, it’s gone. It’s like building something with my eyes closed. The things I can count on the most in this complicated process are persistence and time. Good work requires breaking rules that I have cultivated over the years. It requires additional trials and errors that allow me to see the new possibilities. I have to be patient in sticking to the goal.

    The process is very slow and it’s done with my tiny brain with yet smaller art window looking out where the work sits. I go around the work so many times trying to look through the window mostly failing to see what’s out there. But eventually I succeed in mapping the area. I slowly build the work. I try to feel my way through every inch of the surface. In fact, it’s much less than an inch. Sometimes a tiny dot might make a big difference, like a tiny sparkle in somebody’s eye that can make him come alive. But it gets complicated when the work doesn’t even have an eye or a face. It’s a very time consuming process. But when the work is done. It’s very obvious. I am at a special place only with my work and myself. Nothing else matters and I am completely at peace, or completely excited.

    So how do I go about it? My approach is to start from drawings. That’s my map to guide me to where I will be struggling. The lines, subtle shades of tones, shapes, these things can imply the vast process that I will be going through. I keep my sketchbook with me all the time. I try to brain storm on papers and come up with recurring shapes that literally ask me to work on as it starts to appear as a three dimensional piece in my imagination. Or sometime it just pops right on the page and I’m certain that I have to work on it.

    I started out as a painter so building structures can be rather crude with lots of trials and errors. I mostly use materials you can find at a hardware store: Wood, insulation foam, burlap, plaster, roofing tar, spray paint, and so on. And using newer, more exotic materials has been an interesting challenge today.

    The surface treatment brings up the characters of the piece, It defines the shape, it gives a static object movements, rhythm, surprises, and visual narratives. Or it can even tell you an imaginary history of a catastrophic event, reconciliation, or just endless calmness and richness of unbroken cycle of nature. I have fun going along with the flow. I take chances. I try to see things I didn’t see before. The result, when it works, always surprises me with a fresh presence of its own.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Solo Show in NYC 2013

    In News on

    It’s been 4 years since I showed a set of new works.  Finally I will have a solo show with new works this fall.  The show opens on 10/10/13 at Lori Bookstein Fine Art in NYC.  So far I’m planing to have 3 to 5 large pieces and probably around 4 midsize to smaller ones.  And possibly some small drawings as well…

    Pieces are still in progress… I still can’t see how the pieces fit in the space yet… But here is a floor plan of the space.

  • the lab magazine Interview

    In News on

    Here is a link to an interview with the lab magazine.  It went really well.  Please check it out!

    http://thelabmagazine.com/2013/05/09/hiroyuki-hamada/

  • Pechakucha Talk at Parrish

    In News on

    Following is a text from an event Pechakucha Night Hamptons Vol. 1 at Parrish Art Museum on Thursday, September 20, 2012.

    Thank you for inviting me today. I would like to talk about making sculptures. The first step is to come up with the basic idea for it. This is a tricky process because I am interested in an experience without words, stories or symbols. What I am interested in is to make you feel like you belong to the vast universe that is within the tiny cells we are made of reaching out to the edge of the space out there. It can be a scary feeling. You are all alone just floating in the unknown vastness. You might be stuck with something you don’t understand. Or you might feel like you are nothing. You might be lonely and afraid. But I believe good art can let you feel the vastness and the mystery without the fear. It welcomes you with open arms. And remind you that you belong to that reality. It can be a moment when you look at a painting you love. Or it can last for a whole song when you listen to a great song. Or it can last for a whole chapter of a book. What it does is that it can become a bridge between that part of you and you buried in our everyday life. It gives us the courage to go on and it gives us the courage to embrace the unknown with curiosity and excitement.

    Making process is a weird thing. You open yourself in certain ways at the same time you let go of other things. It’s not like solving a math problem where you add a fixed number to a fixed number for instance. Most of the time you can’t even see all the numbers you are adding. And the missing numbers can only be seen with your heart and soul. For an average man in mid 40s, jaded, cynical and disillusioned, it is not easy. As soon as I think I caught something, it’s gone. It’s like building something with my eyes closed. The things I can count on the most in this complicated process are persistence and time. Good work requires breaking rules that I have cultivated over the years. It requires additional trials and errors that allow me to see the new possibilities. I have to be patient in sticking to the goal.

    The process is very slow and it’s done with my tiny brain with yet smaller art window looking out where the work sits. I go around the work so many times trying to look through the window mostly failing to see what’s out there. But eventually I succeed in mapping the area. I slowly build the work. I try to feel my way through every inch of the surface. In fact, it’s much less than an inch. Sometimes a tiny dot might make a big difference, like a tiny sparkle in somebody’s eye that can make him come alive. But it gets complicated when the work doesn’t even have an eye or a face. It’s a very time consuming process. But when the work is done. It’s very obvious. I am at a special place only with my work and myself. Nothing else matters and I am completely at peace, or completely excited.

    So how do I go about it? My approach is to start from drawings. That’s my map to guide me to where I will be struggling. The lines, subtle shades of tones, shapes, these things can imply the vast process that I will be going through. I keep my sketchbook with me all the time. I try to brain storm on papers and come up with recurring shapes that literally ask me to work on as it starts to appear as a three dimensional piece in my imagination. Or sometime it just pops right on the page and I’m certain that I have to work on it.

    I started out as a painter so building structures can be rather crude with lots of trials and errors. I mostly use materials you can find at a hardware store: Wood, insulation foam, burlap, plaster, roofing tar, spray paint, and so on. And using newer, more exotic materials has been an interesting challenge today.

    The surface treatment brings up the characters of the piece, It defines the shape, it gives a static object movements, rhythm, surprises, and visual narratives. Or it can even tell you an imaginary history of a catastrophic event, reconciliation, or just endless calmness and richness of unbroken cycle of nature. I have fun going along with the flow. I take chances. I try to see things I didn’t see before. The result, when it works, always surprises me with a fresh presence of its own.

     

    Following images were shown during the talk–20 images, each shown for 20 seconds.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Pechakucha Night Hamptons Vol. 1 Thursday, September 20, 2012 – 6:00pm to 9:00pm

     

     

  • January Biannual 03 Interview

    In News on

     

    Last year I was interviewed by January Biannual:  A beautiful crowd-funded publication with no advertisements.  I enjoyed answering the questions very much.

    Here is how they describe themselves:

    “JANUARYbiannual is a publication with small dreams.  We are inspired to touch just a few, but in a way that is lasting and profound.

    JANUARYbiannual is fascinated by substance, by depth, by fortitude, and by integrity.

    It is our humble ambition to slow things down, for just a little while”.

    I think that’s wonderful.  Please check out the publication.

    Here is a link to the interview (a pdf file)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • #73 Getting Finishing Touch

    In News on

     

     

  • Raw + Material = Art

    In News on

    Tristan Manco is known for his books on street art. Raw + Material = Art is his first attempt at surveying contemporary fine art. In his own words, “The idea behind the book is to focus on the natural and found materials and low cost, low-tech methods that artists are being drawn to today. Our aim will be to generally inspire and explore the synergy between the artist’s work and their materials.” He certainly succeeds in presenting his theme in the context of contemporary art and the book does even more.

     

    When I learned who would be in the book, I immediately felt that another aspect of this book is the  introduction of artists emerging on the internet. For the past decade or so the internet has quietly moved into the traditional contemporary art scene with somewhat varied angles on both artists’ geographical origins and their approaches. Numerous image based sites have been inspiring countless personal sites. We’ve been exposed to many artists not necessarily affiliated with established galleries, museums, and other major art institutions. For the first time in the history of contemporary art, visual art is experiencing the true possibility of democratic participation. It is no longer a necessity to live close to a large city with major galleries and museums to explore some segment of visual art. The authoritative voices of art critics, major art collectors, and major art institutions often do not reach the common ground offered by the internet.

     

    The new venue is not without its problems. The accuracy of representation through our computer screens will be an issue for some artists. Some art just does not present well that way. The same has been true in music. The proliferation of inexpensive personal devices and compressed music files has been a blessing for some music but not for the others, which I believe has been adding to the sad decline of classical music (Ironically, if you look at the high end audio world, this is the best time to enjoy classical music). Secondly, the emphasis on cheap materials and inexpensive ways of making might not be a coincidence since many of the artists are not supported by the art-as-investment-network of collectors, galleries, auction houses, museums and so on. The generous exposure some artists might enjoy online does not guarantee any form of financial reward. As the world faces the limitations of capitalistic pursuit, the art world and the artists keep searching for practical ways to make their contributions.

     

    In any case, Tristan has nonetheless done a great job of putting together this wonderful book featuring 38 notable artists today in large format, 256 glossy color pages.  It’s a celebration of the new era with the new artists.  Anybody who enjoys looking around online for fascinating new art will find at least some artists to look at.  I hope you enjoy the book.

     

    Here are some snap shots of the pages, although they hardly do justice to the beautiful book itself…

     


    Michael Johansson:  michaeljohansson.com


    Gabriel Dawe:  gabrieldawe.com


    Hiroyuki Hamada:  hiroyukihamada.com


    Aj Fosik:  ajfosik.com


    Klaus Dauven:  klaus-dauven.de


    Elfo:  elfostreetart.blogspot.com


    Ron van der Ende:  ronvanderend.nl


    Rosemarie Fiore:  rosemariefiore.com


    Henrique Oliveira:  henriqueoliveira.com


    Erik Otto:  erikotto.com


    Mia Pearlman:  miapearlman.com


    Peter Callesen:  petercallesen.com


    Luis Valdes: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lpower/


    Felipe Barbosa:  felipebarbosa.com

    Many more artists are included in the book.  All of them are worth looking at.  Here is a list of their websites.

    Felipe Barbosa:  felipebarbosa.com
    Andres Basurto: Atenaestudio.com
    Zadok Ben-David:  zadokbendavid.com
    Robert Bradford:  robertbradford.co.uk
    Peter Callesen:  petercallesen.com
    Monica Canilao:  monicacanilao.com
    Klaus Dauven:  klaus-dauven.de
    Gabriel Dawe:  gabrieldawe.com
    Baptiste Debombourg:  baptistedebombourg.com
    Brian Dettmer:  briandettmer.com
    Elfo:  elfostreetart.blogspot.com
    Ron van der Ende:  ronvanderend.nl
    Aj Fosik:  ajfosik.com
    Rosemarie Fiore:  rosemariefiore.com
    Faile:  faile.net
    Fumakaka:  fumakaka.com
    Sayaka Kajita Ganz:  sayakaganz.com
    Jose Enrique Porras Gomez:  olaganandoespacio.wordpress.com
    Hiroyuki Hamada:  hiroyukihamada.com
    Haroshi:  haroshi.com
    Valerie Hegarty:  valeriehegarty.com
    Luiz Hermano:  Luizhermano.com
    Florentijn Hofman:  florentijnhofman.nl
    Michael Johansson:  michaeljohansson.com
    Anouk Kruithof:  anoukkruithof.nl
    Jae-Hyo Lee:  leeart.name
    Luzinterruptus:  luzinterruptus.com
    Maria Nepomuceno:  victoria-miro.com
    Henrique Oliveira:  henriqueoliveira.com
    Erik Otto:  erikotto.com
    Mia Pearlman:  miapearlman.com
    Lionel Sabatte:  lionelsabatte.com
    Chris Silva:  chrissilva.com
    Lucas Simoes:  lucassimoes.com.br
    Yuken Teruya:  yukenteruyastudio.com
    Luis Valdes:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/lpower/
    Felipe Yung:  flipink.blogspot.com
    Carlos Zuniga:  carloszuniga.org

    Raw + Material = Art is published by Thames & Hudson Ltd (UK) in April 2012

     

     

  • “of WHITE” at Nuartlink

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    #56, 2005-10, 41 1/2 x 41 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches, enamel, oil, plaster, tar and wax

     

    Venturing into the abstract while suggesting simplicity and 

    light, White can create a special harmony and resonance. 

     

    ~ opening reception February 16th, 2012, 6 to 8 pm

     

    Nuartlink is pleased to present “of White”, a group exhibition of works by artists

    pushing the boundaries of their media using the limitless color white.

    As contrasting as their approaches are, these artists share the same dialogue. They

    skillfully manipulate their materials to reflect ideas and emotions, encouraging our

    minds to seek a deeper vision of their work.

    Bringing together a diverse range of media, “of white” engages the viewer’s

    intellectual curiosity in exploring the unique visual possibilities “of White”.

    203.858.2067
    info@nuartlink.com
    vida@nuartlink.com
    nicholas@nuartlink.com

    19-b Post Road East, Westport, CT 06880
    (Parker Harding Plaza – Entrance next to Starbucks on the river)
    Tuesday- Sunday 11-6 p.m. and by appointment