Posts tagged with ‘Painting’

  • Freud Monk Gallery Interview

    by Adam Reid Fox

    March 18, 2019

    To begin, could you tell me a little about yourself and your background?

    I grew up in Japan till I was 18. My family came to the States in the late 80s because of my father’s job. So I’ve been exposed to different sets of values, beliefs and norms from two different countries. This has been very helpful in constructing my world view from my own perspective as well as steering my path into my studio practice in art.

    Describe your journey to becoming, (or identifying as) an artist. Has it been easy? Natural? What has been difficult?

    When I went to college my initial interest was in psychology. I think I wanted to find out who we are as a species after learning that prevalent angles in one culture are not necessarily valid in others. Then I took some elective courses in art and one of the art teachers, Karl Jacobson, showed me how visual language can let us speak to each other despite our cultural boundaries. This really shocked me and moved me. It was profound and surprising. I eventually changed my major and started to spend all my time in making art. Looking back it was perhaps natural in a way since as a child I was always making things and drawing. But I really didn’t grow up with art and becoming an artist was not something I would do. I think being displaced and being forced to reexamine my identity somehow freed me in that regard.

    How would you describe your work to someone?

    I describe materials, physical attributes and so on a little, and I usually end up saying that you have to see it. I like an element of the unknown to play a good part in the work so it is difficult to verbalize it.

    What is important for viewers to note when viewing your work?

    I would like them to know that all viewers are invited to appreciate my work. I understand that we don’t share the same background and we have different ways of perceiving things. And I would like to know what they think of them and how they feel about them.

    What is your process like? How important is process in understanding your work?

    The core process seems to be brainstorming through drawing. Basic ideas emerge from it. Some of them become sculptures and others become prints. Paintings follow a different process. I usually go right in without preconceived ideas. I rely on visual elements appearing on the surface to guide the overall dynamics. It can be a very thrilling process with surprises and dramas, and it can also be very meditative and liberating. And all my work, including sculptures and prints, involve this process of examining dynamics within the work—I want all elements to play necessary rolls to compose the profound wholeness.

    I like hearing about artists’ process, but other than that, I don’t know if knowing the process would facilitate the understanding… Also, the process is hardly formulated…it’s very bumpy and often tortuously long and frustrating. But sometimes it goes very smooth. Come to think of it, there might be some keys in understanding the particular work in its particular process…

    But basically making process to me is about observing and letting the elements speak as they form relationships among themselves. So any preconceived formula, rule and so on can be very much hazardous, as much as instructive, as they can get in the way of new discoveries.

    I’m interested to know how you arrived at your choice of process, materials, and ‘style?’ How did this develop?

    Those things are developed by the path of my studio practice. One thing leads to another, I digest the process, and it gives birth to more paths and options, and after awhile I have ended up with a trajectory with certain materials, process and “style”. It all happens in an intermingling dynamic of various elements though. It’s hard to pin point a cause and the effect when I’m in the middle of processing multiple phenomenons on multiple dimensions. A lot of things happen intuitively. I do stop and contemplate here and there, but after all it seems that those things are determined by the works themselves.

    What does your work aim to say?

    Each piece is different so I can’t generalize too much, but I’m very much fascinated by the mode of communication through arts. I think a successful art work allows us to convey a genuine experience without truncating details when it takes us over and flourishes in our hearts. You can live a moment with its infinite connection to ourselves and our environment. And sometimes you can share the experience with others too. I think this is particularly meaningful in a highly authoritarian society, like ours, that systematically and structurally truncates our connections to self, others, matters and environment by limiting them to quantifiable commodities. It is extraordinary that such a trajectory has deprived us of our ability to sense the risks of environmental destruction, nuclear threat and so on. But art can somehow give us a common ground to stand on. I don’t claim this to solve anything, give us a revelation of our time or anything like that, but it is still a profound fact that we have this gift of our life that defies certain obstacles among us for a moment.

    Can you highlight some of your influences and discuss how they have impacted your work?

    I’m sure I get influenced by other artists’ paths here and there, but overwhelmingly, it is my own path in my studio that affects the work the most. I usually have a few pieces in progress so they sort of feed each other in terms of directions, methods and so on. Also, making prints might do something to sculpture making, while sculptures might affect the paintings and so on. It’s all fluid, organic and dialectic.

    Where do you find inspiration?

    Again, things that happen in my studio get me going. It’s exciting to see mere shapes, lines, tones and so on suddenly find their voices and start making dynamics, flows, visual narratives and presences. When I get stuck I listen to music. I also have an electric guitar for releasing some tension and having fun. I also read and write. Actually, making art can be pretty tough, I get stuck quite often.

    In your experience, what is the best thing about being an artist? What is the hardest thing about being an artist?

    There are moments when you forget about everything and you just appreciate the time you spend making the work. And there are even more special moments when you literally melt with the experience of having your work culminate into a finished work. You lose sense of time and space and be one with the experience. Such times are so special that I feel just happy doing what I do in my studio.

    The tough part is that I am aware of what art can be and I struggle with what I can do with art as I look at things outside of my studio with my artist’s eyes. I connect dots and I try to make sense out of events, facts and contexts just as I do in my studio with visual elements. I see that our era is not a time of “democracy”, “freedom”, “humanity” and so on. Awful things are done in the name of those things.

    If you were not an artist, what would you be?

    I really can’t imagine…

    What piece of advice would you give to a young artist?

    The World is huge. Much bigger than the tiny cage old people call “country”, “society”, “culture” and so on. We the artists know the infinite universe of true liberation. Tell people stories about freedom, what it is to be humans, try not to build cages for the people.

    Interview at Freud Monk Gallery

    Wall Sculptures at Freud Monk Gallery

  • Untitled Painting 033

    In Art, new work, Painting on

    Here is my new painting with a few detail shots: 033, 40 x 30 inches, acrylic, 2018.

    This is one of those pieces that took me a long while to come to some sort of a resolution. I feel comfortable enough to show it, but I do still envision alternate scenarios for its visual narrative.

    But I guess that’s fine. Uncertainty, instability and temporariness seem to fill the air as the hierarchical machine of money and violence continues to divide us and fragment our thoughts.

    Thank god we have art to reflect ourselves and our time in a cogent manner, and share it for what it is. I thank you all for looking at my work, and I wish you all a wonderful day.


    Untitled Painting 033, 40 x 30 inches, acrylic, 2018


    Detail view

    Detail view


    Detail view

  • Untitled Painting 032

    In Art, new work, News, Painting on


    Untitled Painting 032, 40 x 30 inches, acrylic, charcoal, oil and paper, 2018


    Detail view

  • Gorky’s Granddaughter: Hiroyuki Hamada, April 2018

    I had a wonderful studio visit by Zachary Keeting and Christopher Joy from Gorky’s Granddaughter a few weeks ago. They captured it nicely for you to see it as well.

  • Laid, Placed, and Arranged: A Panel Discussion at The Phillips Collection

    In Art, Artist, News, panel discussion on

    There will be a panel discussion on the show at the University of Maryland Gallery on November 9th. 6:30pm at the Phillips Collection. If you know anyone in the area who might be interested, please let them know.

    Event details from the Phillips Collection site: “Join artists Hiroyuki Hamada, Francie Hester, Ellington Robinson, and Wilfredo Valladares, along with exhibition curator and moderator Taras W. Matla, as they discuss their contributions to the exhibition Laid, Placed, and Arranged, on view now through December 8, 2017, at the University of Maryland Art Gallery.

    This exhibition and panel discussion is in partnership with The Phillips Collection and its ongoing series Creative Voices DC. Financial support provided by the Dorothy and Nicholas Orem Exhibition Fund and a generous grant from the Maryland State Arts Council.”

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  • University of Maryland Art Gallery show

    In Art, Artist, Exhibition, News, Painting, Sculpture on

    Four of my sculptures and two of my paintings will be in a show at the University of Maryland Art Gallery.  There will be a catalog with my interview as well.

    I’m looking forward to seeing the new paintings with the sculptures.  The show opens on September 6th, 2017 and runs through December 8th, 2017.

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    Untitled painting 011, 60" x 40", acrylic, charcoal, enamel, oil, 2015

    Here is the info from the gallery:

    “The University of Maryland Art Gallery invites you to an evening reception for Laid, Placed, and Arranged. This exhibition explores recent work made by six University of Maryland MFA alumni — Laurel Farrin, Hiroyuki Hamada, Francie Hester, Meg Mitchell, Ellington Robinson, and Wilfredo Valladares — who have gone on to become significant voices in the realm of contemporary art and academia.

    Laid, Placed, and Arranged will be on view September 6-December 8, 2017, and is supported in part by a generous grant from the Maryland State Arts Council. Complimentary table hors d’oeuvres along with a selection of wine, beer, and soft drinks will be served.

    Admission is free and open to the public.

    Opening Reception
    Wednesday, September 6, 2017, 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

    Location
    University of Maryland Art Gallery
    1202 Parren J. Mitchell Art-Sociology Bldg.

    Parking
    After 4:00 p.m. parking is free in Lots JJ2, JJ3, and 1b.
    (At the intersection of Mowatt Lane and Campus Drive.)

    Also On View
    A series of smaller exhibitions — some rotating, others permanent — round out the visitor experience at the Gallery. Make sure to check out In Memoriam: Andy Dunnill and Recent Gifts.”

  • New Painting, Untitled Painting 031

    In Art, Artist, News, Painting on

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    Untitled Painting 031, 48 x 60 inches, acrylic, 2017

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    Detail view

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    Detail view

  • New Painting, Untitled Painting 030

    In Art, News, Painting on

     

     

     

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    Untitled Painting 030, 60 x 48 inches, acrylic, 2017

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    Detail view

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    Detail view

  • New Painting, Untitled Painting 029

    In Art, News, Painting on

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    Untitled Painting 029, 48 x 60 inches, acrylic, 2017

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    Untitled Painting 029 (detail)

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    Untitled Painting 029 (detail)

     

  • The Recent Paintings will be at Lori Bookstein Fine Arts, NYC

    In Exhibition, News, Painting on

    The next show will be all paintings.  I’m very excited to share the work with you.  The show opens 9/10/2015 at Lori Bookstein Fine Arts.  The opening reception is from 6pm to 8pm.  Everyone is invited!

     

    Press release from Lori Bookstein Fine Art:
    Hiroyuki Hamada: Paintings
    September 10 – October 17, 2015

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art is pleased to announce an exhibition of recent paintings by Hiroyuki Hamada. This is the artist’s third solo-show with the gallery.

    Rigorously painted on paper and then mounted on canvas and board, these paintings maintain the same level of craftsmanship that are characteristic of the artist’s sculptural practice. Executed in a fully realized gray-scale (save one painting in which an icy blue predominates) the paintings utilize a similar mixture of acrylic, charcoal, enamel, graphite and oil that the artist uses to polychrome his sculpture.

    The artist writes of his work:

    It’s been my habit to draw for many years. My sculptures often start from drawings and so do my prints. But it took me twenty years to go back to full-fledged paintings.

    The process of making paintings can be faster (than, for example, the building process of a sculpture) more flexible, and it can allow spontaneous happenings and development of visual narratives, which can lead to a glimpse of depth and the richness of who we really are.

    But I’m also rediscovering how draining and strenuous the process can be. It is the process of dropping all my daily concerns and opening all my antennas to feel beyond my ordinary spheres and gaze back into myself, all the while putting my faith in the mostly fruitless struggle of digging and building toward the rare confrontation with the moment of a resolution.

    It is certainly one of the most meaningful activities for me but it is one of the most challenging acts as well.

    May 29th, 2015

    Hiroyuki Hamada was born in 1968 in Tokyo, Japan. He moved to the United States at the age of 18. Hamada studied at West Liberty State College, WV before receiving his MFA from the University of Maryland. Hamada has been included in numerous exhibitions throughout the United States including his previous exhibitions, Hiroyuki Hamada and Hiroyuki Hamada: Two Sculptures, at Lori Bookstein Fine Art. He was the recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts Grant in 2009 and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 1998. Most recently, Hamada’s work was featured in Tristan Manco’s Raw + Material = Art (Thames & Hudson). The artist lives and works in East Hampton, NY.

    Hiroyuki Hamada: Paintings will be on view from September 10 – October 17, 2015. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, September 10th from 6-8 pm. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10:30 am to 6:00 pm. For additional information and/or visual materials, please contact Joseph Bunge at (212) 750-0949 or by email at joseph@loribooksteinfineart.com.

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art
    138 Tenth Avenue
    New York, NY 10011
    Between 18th and 19th Streets

    Summer Hours: Monday-Friday, 10:30-6:00
    Closed: August 9 – September 9, 2015

    Telephone | 212.750.0949
    Email | info@loribooksteinfineart.com