Posts tagged with ‘Sculpture’

  • A Group Show in NYC

    In News on

    This show is organized by Aureus Contemporary. Participating artists are Alejandro Diaz-Ayala, Jeremy Dean, Jeff Depner, Pauline Galiana, Hiroyuki Hamada, Karim Hamid, William P Immer, Michael Mapes, Claire Shegog and Yi-Hsin Tzeng.

    You can learn more about the show at the site.

    Come say hi! We’ll have an opening on April 4th 7-10pm.

     


    #63, 2006-10, 45 x 40 x 24 inches, burlap, enamel, oil, plaster, resin, tar, wax and wood


    #68, 2007-09, 41 x 23 x 20 1/2 inches, enamel, oil, plaster, tar and wax


    #53, 2005-2008, 38 diameter x 14 1/2 inches, enamel, oil, plaster, tar and wax

     

    4 april to 14 april 2013

    opening night: 4 APRIL 7-10pm

    operating 11 – 6pm
    (closed on Monday)

    coordinates: NYC, 520 W 27th Street, btw 10th & 11th

  • Pechakucha Talk at Parrish

    In News on

    Following is a text from an event Pechakucha Night Hamptons Vol. 1 at Parrish Art Museum on Thursday, September 20, 2012.

    Thank you for inviting me today. I would like to talk about making sculptures. The first step is to come up with the basic idea for it. This is a tricky process because I am interested in an experience without words, stories or symbols. What I am interested in is to make you feel like you belong to the vast universe that is within the tiny cells we are made of reaching out to the edge of the space out there. It can be a scary feeling. You are all alone just floating in the unknown vastness. You might be stuck with something you don’t understand. Or you might feel like you are nothing. You might be lonely and afraid. But I believe good art can let you feel the vastness and the mystery without the fear. It welcomes you with open arms. And remind you that you belong to that reality. It can be a moment when you look at a painting you love. Or it can last for a whole song when you listen to a great song. Or it can last for a whole chapter of a book. What it does is that it can become a bridge between that part of you and you buried in our everyday life. It gives us the courage to go on and it gives us the courage to embrace the unknown with curiosity and excitement.

    Making process is a weird thing. You open yourself in certain ways at the same time you let go of other things. It’s not like solving a math problem where you add a fixed number to a fixed number for instance. Most of the time you can’t even see all the numbers you are adding. And the missing numbers can only be seen with your heart and soul. For an average man in mid 40s, jaded, cynical and disillusioned, it is not easy. As soon as I think I caught something, it’s gone. It’s like building something with my eyes closed. The things I can count on the most in this complicated process are persistence and time. Good work requires breaking rules that I have cultivated over the years. It requires additional trials and errors that allow me to see the new possibilities. I have to be patient in sticking to the goal.

    The process is very slow and it’s done with my tiny brain with yet smaller art window looking out where the work sits. I go around the work so many times trying to look through the window mostly failing to see what’s out there. But eventually I succeed in mapping the area. I slowly build the work. I try to feel my way through every inch of the surface. In fact, it’s much less than an inch. Sometimes a tiny dot might make a big difference, like a tiny sparkle in somebody’s eye that can make him come alive. But it gets complicated when the work doesn’t even have an eye or a face. It’s a very time consuming process. But when the work is done. It’s very obvious. I am at a special place only with my work and myself. Nothing else matters and I am completely at peace, or completely excited.

    So how do I go about it? My approach is to start from drawings. That’s my map to guide me to where I will be struggling. The lines, subtle shades of tones, shapes, these things can imply the vast process that I will be going through. I keep my sketchbook with me all the time. I try to brain storm on papers and come up with recurring shapes that literally ask me to work on as it starts to appear as a three dimensional piece in my imagination. Or sometime it just pops right on the page and I’m certain that I have to work on it.

    I started out as a painter so building structures can be rather crude with lots of trials and errors. I mostly use materials you can find at a hardware store: Wood, insulation foam, burlap, plaster, roofing tar, spray paint, and so on. And using newer, more exotic materials has been an interesting challenge today.

    The surface treatment brings up the characters of the piece, It defines the shape, it gives a static object movements, rhythm, surprises, and visual narratives. Or it can even tell you an imaginary history of a catastrophic event, reconciliation, or just endless calmness and richness of unbroken cycle of nature. I have fun going along with the flow. I take chances. I try to see things I didn’t see before. The result, when it works, always surprises me with a fresh presence of its own.

     

    Following images were shown during the talk–20 images, each shown for 20 seconds.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Pechakucha Night Hamptons Vol. 1 Thursday, September 20, 2012 – 6:00pm to 9:00pm

     

     

  • January Biannual 03 Interview

    In News on

     

    Last year I was interviewed by January Biannual:  A beautiful crowd-funded publication with no advertisements.  I enjoyed answering the questions very much.

    Here is how they describe themselves:

    “JANUARYbiannual is a publication with small dreams.  We are inspired to touch just a few, but in a way that is lasting and profound.

    JANUARYbiannual is fascinated by substance, by depth, by fortitude, and by integrity.

    It is our humble ambition to slow things down, for just a little while”.

    I think that’s wonderful.  Please check out the publication.

    Here is a link to the interview (a pdf file)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • #73 Getting Finishing Touch

    In News on

     

     

  • Connie and Bill

    In News on

    Last week I was helping a painter friend, Connie Fox, document her work for a magazine article. It’s always nice to feel a connection through what artists do in our studios. Quite often, the generation gap, cultural gap, or anything that usually could be in between two people just vanishes when we talk about art. Since I wrote a bit last week about what I want my work to do, I was curious what she’d say about the artist’s contribution. She’s survived as an artist much longer than I have. In fact she turns 88 this year. And she is still a very active painter.

    I heard what she said and I decided to record it so that I could remember. Here is what I recorded:

    “The artist is involved with the spirit of the human being. And it’s very necessary to have that part of human life be in existence in any society to help keep it on the track so it’s not all matter of who wins, who loses, who makes the most profit, who comes out on top or who has the most power”.

    I told her that that’s pretty much what I wrote last week. We laughed. I felt good sharing a moment with her standing on the same ground, believing what we do. Very special moment actually.

    Then, of course, it made me think if we’ve done any good… She was born in the 1920s. She’s seen the whole growth of corporate domination and the expansion of western neo-colonialism. And in our cultural sphere, she’s seen the whole process of the mystery of our being and our sacred relationship to the universe being replaced with the substanceless marketing ploy of mystique which ultimately serves the status quo of our time: commercialism, militarism, alienation and apathy. Where are we going? As artists, and as a species?

    But seeing 87 year old Connie proclaiming her vision was more than enough to make all those concerns irrelevant for the moment. I should also mention that her husband, Bill King, is also an artist–a wonderful sculptor, still very active. He is also turning 88 this year. I should write about them sometime. I sometimes think of them with a sense of awe and reverence. They are the living proof of art providing life with beauty and dignity.

  • #75 in progress

    In News on

    Here is a surprising development with #75. A few months ago I noticed a sculpture by a friend, Kim Matthews, which had an interesting color and texture. She described to me that she casted paper pulp to make the shape and she used a special paint which had metal powder in it. The painted surface reacted with rusting agent to make beautiful orange and brown rusty surface. The result was very effective in creating a curious blend of rough paper surface with rusty metallic hue. I’ve been wanting to try it out and when I thought of making #75, I knew it was going to be the piece. It’s a rather small piece but it also has a large, monumental feel to it. I thought the weight of rusty metallic look might be perfect for it. And it looks like it’s working very well.

  • Tentatively titled #72

    In News on

    One of the new pieces…

     

  • An Interview on Japan and Creativity

    In News on

    Recently I was interviewed about Japan and creativity.  It’s a part of Richard Galbraith’s project at Cementum.
    I enjoyed the interview very much.  Here is the link.



     

     

     

  • Anish Kapoor in NYC

    In News on

    Last week I saw two outstanding shows in New York City. Both of them are by Anish Kapoor (Gladstone Gallery on 21st Street and 24th Street).
    The works are effortlessly graceful with plenty of formal delights and profound weight. It’s great to see his bold yet delicate methods let the
    materials flow and glow in their own rights.

    One show has multiple towers of cement (Gladstone Gallery on 24th Street). Take your time and walk among them. You start to see character
    in each tower and you realize that they are not just random piles. Then you start to see the vision of the artist who let these strange
    magical towers appear (here is an article about the interesting making process).


    Anish Kapoor at Gladstone gallery, 24th Street 2012


    Anish Kapoor at Gladstone gallery, 24th Street 2012


    Anish Kapoor at Gladstone gallery, 24th Street 2012


    Anish Kapoor at Gladstone gallery, 24th Street 2012


    Anish Kapoor at Gladstone gallery, 24th Street 2012


    Anish Kapoor at Gladstone gallery, 24th Street 2012


    Anish Kapoor at Gladstone gallery, 24th Street 2012

    The other show places a large round steel structure that fills up a large open space (Gladstone Gallery on 21st Steet). You get the “wow” feeling
    as soon as you walk in the room, and as you walk around, you just tell yourself “wtf”. It’s also fun to see how people react to the piece and
    interact with it. It’s great to see people being so happily awed and overwhelmed by the piece. It gives confidence to anybody who loves and believes in art.


    Anish Kapoor at Gladstone gallery, 21st Street 2012


    Anish Kapoor at Gladstone gallery, 21st Street 2012


    Anish Kapoor at Gladstone gallery, 21st Street 2012

     

    There was one more thing. My friend and I walked in one of the churches on our way to the galleries
    (St. Thomas on 5th avenue). Ah, what a space to get away and immense yourself in the quietness with the church organ.
    Everything just stopped and my mind was reset, at least for the moment.

    A city needs a place like that or great art to make you feel that you are connected to something big and mysterious.  A great city
    like New York has both.


    Saint Thomas Church

     

  • “of WHITE” at Nuartlink

    In News on



    #56, 2005-10, 41 1/2 x 41 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches, enamel, oil, plaster, tar and wax

     

    Venturing into the abstract while suggesting simplicity and 

    light, White can create a special harmony and resonance. 

     

    ~ opening reception February 16th, 2012, 6 to 8 pm

     

    Nuartlink is pleased to present “of White”, a group exhibition of works by artists

    pushing the boundaries of their media using the limitless color white.

    As contrasting as their approaches are, these artists share the same dialogue. They

    skillfully manipulate their materials to reflect ideas and emotions, encouraging our

    minds to seek a deeper vision of their work.

    Bringing together a diverse range of media, “of white” engages the viewer’s

    intellectual curiosity in exploring the unique visual possibilities “of White”.

    203.858.2067
    info@nuartlink.com
    vida@nuartlink.com
    nicholas@nuartlink.com

    19-b Post Road East, Westport, CT 06880
    (Parker Harding Plaza – Entrance next to Starbucks on the river)
    Tuesday- Sunday 11-6 p.m. and by appointment