• ArtBBQ

    In News on

    I really like Ron van der Ende‘s sculptures.  They are just great for what they are, but I personally feel closeness to his work since I share some of the visual concerns in my work.  I got to know him a little through Facebook and he has asked me to participate in his annual studio music playlist, ArtBBQ.  More than 40 artists have come up with lists of albums they played in their studios in 2011.  I’ve been busy checking out new music there.

    Ron van der Ende Corsair 2010 bas-relief in salvaged wood 180 x 87 x 12cm

     

    Studio Playlist 2011 #27 : Hiroyuki Hamada

    Popol Vuh – Tantric Songs / Hosianna Mantra
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJXatdeOf3E
    Dar Williams – Mortal City
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgXYX35vn4Y
    Fact – Fact
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQwPao3Shk4
    J. Mascis – Several Shades of Why
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VDMxEYIZJ4
    Sigur Ros – ( )
    http://vimeo.com/3977534
    Jonsi – Go
    http://vimeo.com/9289064
    Up Front – Spirit
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hN4dFD9h6Bk
    Adrian Belew – Salad Days
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yIIr1nIpZ4
    Child Abuse – Cut and Run
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q08DY0CqzPE
    Buzzard – Exercises & Transmutations of the applicable techniques for the chrome-plated mystical squeegie of destiny
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xk7Oue3b4g
    Plan B – The Defamation of Strickland Banks
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyVrQLunzf8
    Pendulum – Hold your color
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kJ09FpWoaM

    In between above and many more I listened lots of classical music (late Beethoven string
    quartets, Mahler and Bruckner symphonies, Chopin and so on and on) and various electronic
    music of sorts.

    My studio with a few pieces in progress.  I’m hoping that I can finish a couple this year…

    Hiroyuki HamadaStudio Playlists 2011

     

  • Group Show in NYC Opens This Week

    In News on

    The show is organized by my friend, Frank Webster, with Paul Brainard.  There are more than 20 people in the show so there will be lots to see.

    Die Like You Really Mean It:

    October 26 – December 3, 2011

    Opening reception:  October 26, 6-9PM

    Allegra LaViola Gallery

    179 East Broadway

    New York, NY 10002

    917-463-3901

    Featuring works of:

    Erik BensonPaul BrainardPia DehneHiroyuki HamadaElizabeth HueyErika Keck,
    Emily Noelle LambertFrank LentiniEddie MartinezBrian MontouriBryan OsburnKanishka Raja,
    Erika RaneeTom SanfordChristopher SaundersKristen SchieleRyan SchneiderOliver Warden,
    Frank WebsterEric White and Doug Young

    You can see some works included in the show here and here.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Aureus Contemporary at cutlog, Paris

    In News on
  • Lori Bookstein Fine Art Opening Photos

    In News on

    Here are some images from the opening night…

     

    Hiroyuki Hamada: Two Sculptures

    IN GALLERY II

    September 15 – October 15, 2011

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art

    138 TENTH AVENUE NEW YORK NY 10011

    Tel 212-750-0949

    www.LORIBOOKSTEINFINEART.COM

     

  • Die Like You Really Mean It

    In News on

     

    Participating artists:

    Erik Benson, Paul Brainard, Pia Dehne, Hiroyuki Hamada, Elizabeth Huey, Erika Keck,
    Emily Noelle Lambert, Frank Lentini, Eddie Martinez, Brian Montouri, Bryan Osburn, Kanishka Raja,
    Erika Ranee, Tom Sanford, Christopher Saunders, Kristen Schiele, Ryan Schneider, Oliver Warden,
    Frank Webster, Eric White and Doug Young

     

    Allegra LaViola Gallery | 179 East Broadway | New York, NY 10002
    T 917.463.3901 E gallery@allegralaviola.com
    www.allegralaviola.com

     

    Gallery hours
    Wednesday – Saturday: 12-6PM
    Sunday: 1-6PM

    Opening Reception:  October 26, 6-9PM

     

    Allegra La Viola Gallery is pleased to present Die Like You Really Mean It, a group exhibition on view
    from October 26 – December 7. The exhibition is curated by artists Paul Brainard and Frank Webster
    and features new paintings and sculpture by over twenty artists living in the New York metro area.

    The curators have assembled an energetic and dynamic show, where each work registers as a highly
    charged expression of the individual artist. Brainard and Webster have maintained a special interest
    in choosing works that register not as intentionally ironic but rather as sincerely and at times
    viscerally rendered. This exhibition celebrates painting as a healthy, living, and variegated mode of
    art making in New York.

    The works included in this exhibition are often resistant to purely formalist and conceptual concerns,
    engaging themes that extend beyond the material media of painting. Figurative and scenic elements
    may invite narrative readings while color is used forcefully, liberally, or selectively. The expressive
    qualities of color among the works range widely from Oliver Warden’s transformative explosions of
    color, to Hiroyuki Hamada’s restrained, bi-chromatic capsule-like wall reliefs. Also of concern among
    the works is the relationship between the human being and its environment, exemplified by Erik
    Benson and Kristen Schiele’s depictions of inhabited indoor and outdoor settings, Pia Dehne’s
    complex compositions in which figure and ground are enmeshed through lyrical patterns of line and
    geometry, and Kanishka Raja’s use of pattern to unite various specific locations depicted in the same
    visual space.

    Atypically, this show exalts in its contrasts. The works of Chris Saunders and Brian Montouri could
    best sum this up. Saunder’s paintings are slick and calm on the surface but belie an unsettling and
    subversive content, while Montouri’s vision is a veritable disgorgement of expressionist storm and
    bluster. Each artist pushes the medium with equal passion, but in radically different directions, with
    starkly different results. This passion however is one thing all of the artists in Die Like You Really
    Mean It share in common.

    —Paul Brainard, Kristen Lorello and Frank Webster

     

  • Damir Doma Opening Photos

    In News on

    Photography by Markus Lambert.

     

     

     

  • Lori Bookstein Fine Art Show Announcement

    In News on

    Hiroyuki Hamada: Two Sculptures

    IN GALLERY II

    September 15 – October 15, 2011

    Reception Thursday, September 15, 6 to 8pm

     

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art is proud to announce its first exhibition of the work of Hiroyuki Hamada. One free standing piece and one wall work will be on view in Gallery II.

    Hamada received his initial training as a painter and as such, the integration of form and surface are paramount to his process. He begins each sculpture by making a foam and wood core, builds it up with burlap and plaster, and finally applies a combination of enamel, oil, plaster, resin, tar, and wax to create an austere and mysterious finish.

    Hamada’s underlying forms imply a deep connection with the geometry of nature, but they remain non-representational. Basic shapes such as the circle, ellipse, and square are gently stretched and torqued under his hand. Hamada favors a limited palette, but he nonetheless conveys myriad ideas, objects, and emotional tones. It is perhaps one’s inability to decisively “place” each work that makes it so richly allusive. Indeed, Hamada’s sculpture may connote an archeological relic, a futuristic spaceship, or the microscopic worlds of cells and molecules, but these are the viewer’s personal speculations, not the artist’s deliberate intentions. The absence of descriptive titles – each work is numbered rather than titled – both frustrates and encourages these open interpretations.

    If a true subject can be said to exist in Hamada’s work, it is the communication of pure visual ideas through a profound dedication to material and craftsmanship. The results of his mature works (the two pieces on view, #53 and #63, were made in 2005-08 and 2006-10, respectively) are elegant but not easy. They are a series of paradoxes: familiar and foreign, painterly and sculptural, minimal and effusive, modern and archaic, industrial and warm. Despite this, each sculpture is a self-contained whole, able to evince formal ideas amidst association and contradiction.

    Hiroyuki Hamada was born in 1968 in Tokyo, Japan. When he was a teenager, his father moved the family to West Virginia. Dramatically uprooted and unable to express himself in his native language, Hamada discovered a compelling means of communication through the study of drawing and painting. The orchestration of line, shape, and other formal properties of drawing were a revelation to him. Hamada attended West Liberty State College in West Virginia before earning his MFA from the University of Maryland. He has participated in artist residencies and exhibited throughout the United States, and was the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant in 1998. He currently lives and works in East Hampton, New York.

     

     

    Pictured: #53 (2005-08). Enamel, oil, plaster, tar, and wax, 38 x 38 x 14 1/2 inches

     

     

     


  • Damir Doma Opening

    In News on

    I’ve been contacted by the office of Damir Doma, a French fashion designer, saying that my work is an inspiration for his Autumn Winter 2011-12 collection.  It’s great to hear that the work spoke to him.  To celebrate the opening of his space at L’Eclaireur, they are showing a few pieces of mine along with his work, his creative setting and etc.  There will be an opening at the space on 9/13 from 5-9pm.  The event happens as L’Eclaireur participates in Paris Design Week.  The event was made possible by the generous cooperation of Bodo Vincent Andrin, Founder & Managing Director of LIGANOVA, who is loaning the pieces for the duration of the show (September 13 – 22).  This marks the first public display of works from LIGANOVA’s LIGAart Collection.  It’ll be a fun thing to stop by if you are in Paris.

     

     

  • Upcoming at Lori Bookstein Fine Art

    In News on

    #63 (2006-10). Burlap, enamel, oil, plaster, resin, tar, wax and wood, 45 x 40 x 24 inches

    Hiroyuki Hamada: Two Sculptures

    IN GALLERY II

    September 15 – October 15, 2011

    Lori Bookstein Fine Art

    138 TENTH AVENUE NEW YORK NY 10011

    Tel 212-750-0949

    www.LORIBOOKSTEINFINEART.COM

  • Working with 7th graders

    In News on

    I’ve been working with 7th graders to put up a show.  There is a fancy private school in my area with a
    program that lets the kids pick artists, interview them, do studio visits, curate a show with them, make
    a catalog, do the opening, and do everything else that’s involved in doing an official exhibition for the public.

    OK, they are 7th graders so they get help from their teacher.  Sue Heatley, besides working at the school,
    is also a sculptor herself and she is experienced in working with art institutions.  Please do not underestimate
    the tremendous feat of giving a good educational experience to a few dozen 7th graders while organizing
    a professional looking show!  She’s done a great job.

    I will have three pieces in the show.  And Drew will also have 3  pieces.  Let’s show up for the opening and make
    the kids happy!

    Here is the info about the show from the school:

    The Ross School Gallery presents its annual student-curated exhibition,
    highlighting the work of professional artists from the community. This year’s
    theme is “Passion and Process.” Curated by Ross School seventh graders,
    under the direction of art teacher Sue Heatley, the show will feature works
    by Hiroyuki Hamada and Drew Shiflett.  The students will host an Opening
    Reception on Wednesday, May 25, from 4 to 6pm. The public is invited.

    As in past years, the students took on various rolls to organize and present the
    show: they visited the artists in their studios, selected work, designed the
    installation, organized publicity, and wrote and produced a catalogue.

    They also had the opportunity to work with each of the artists in their studios
    and will showcase their creations alongside the artists in the show.

    Mr. Hamada’s sculptures start with wood, foam and plaster, and they are
    finished with textured and painted surfaces. Ms. Shiflett uses handmade papers,
    pencil and ink, watercolor and conte crayon with, as she says, “a focus on line,
    light, and texture” to create intricately detailed pieces that fall somewhere between
    drawing, painting and sculpture. The work of both artists is the result of very
    time-consuming and detailed processes.

    “Passion and Process” will be on view at the Ross Gallery through June 15.