Posts tagged with ‘Hiroyuki Hamada’

  • Untitled Painting 001

    In News, Painting on

    I’ve been working on some paintings lately. The process has been very slow as the most of other things in my studio but the mystery that opens up on the unpredictable path is refreshing and liberating.

    Here is one finished piece. 

    painting on paper 04 2nd try website

    Untitled Painting 001, acrylic, charcoal, enamel and oil, 40″ x 30″

  • B18-11

    In News, Print on

    A new print.

     

    B18-11 4 950

     

     

  • B17-22

    In News, Print on

    B17-22 4 blg1000

  • Off the Block

    In Exhibition, News on

    New York Foundation for the Arts is organizing an exhibition with the Southampton Center–the former location of the Parrish Art Museum.  The show opens on 6/26 and the opening reception will be on 6/28.

    I will be showing with Claire Watson and Andreas Rentsh.

    The newly renovated space is GORGEOUS.  I’ve talked with the director Michele Thomson and a board member Siamak Samil.  Both are very excited to establish the venue as a new non-profit center for the arts in the area.  They need your support!  Please come see the show!

    Off The Block:  New York Foundation for the Arts Fellows at Southampton Arts Center

    Hiroyuki Hamada, Andreas Rentsch and Claire Watson

    Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton, NY 11968

    Thursday, June 26 – Sunday, July 20

    Opening reception Saturday, June 28 (5-9pm)

    Exhibition hours:

    • Thursday 12pm-6pm
    • Friday 12pm-8pm
    • Saturday 12pm-8pm
    • Sunday 12pm-5pm

    #81
    #81, 2011-13, oil, resin, and wax, 24″ x 54″ x 25″

    SONY DSC
    #79, 2011-13, painted resin, 26″ x 35″ x 20″

    SONY DSC
    #74, 2010-13, painted resin, 24 1/2″ x 24″ 1/2 x 57″

    SONY DSC
    #76, 2011-13, oil, resin, wax and wood, 46″ x 37″ x 31″

     

     

  • B14-08

    In News, Print on

    A new print

     

     

    B14-08 4test950

  • B18-05

    In News, Print on

    A new print

     

     

    B18-05 6 950

  • Pechakucha Night Hamptons Video

    In News on

    Here is a clip of a short talk I did about making sculpture last year.

    Thank you Andrea Grover and Parrish Art Museum for putting it together.

     

     

    Transcript:

    Thank you for inviting me today. I would like to talk about making sculptures. The first step is to come up with the basic idea for it. This is a tricky process because I am interested in an experience without words, stories or symbols. What I am interested in is to make you feel like you belong to the vast universe that is within the tiny cells we are made of reaching out to the edge of the space out there. It can be a scary feeling. You are all alone just floating in the unknown vastness. You might be stuck with something you don’t understand. Or you might feel like you are nothing. You might be lonely and afraid. But I believe good art can let you feel the vastness and the mystery without the fear. It welcomes you with open arms. And remind you that you belong to that reality. It can be a moment when you look at a painting you love. Or it can last for a whole song when you listen to a great song. Or it can last for a whole chapter of a book. What it does is that it can become a bridge between that part of you and you buried in our everyday life. It gives us the courage to go on and it gives us the courage to embrace the unknown with curiosity and excitement.

    Making process is a weird thing. You open yourself in certain ways at the same time you let go of other things. It’s not like solving a math problem where you add a fixed number to a fixed number for instance. Most of the time you can’t even see all the numbers you are adding. And the missing numbers can only be seen with your heart and soul. For an average man in mid 40s, jaded, cynical and disillusioned, it is not easy. As soon as I think I caught something, it’s gone. It’s like building something with my eyes closed. The things I can count on the most in this complicated process are persistence and time. Good work requires breaking rules that I have cultivated over the years. It requires additional trials and errors that allow me to see the new possibilities. I have to be patient in sticking to the goal.

    The process is very slow and it’s done with my tiny brain with yet smaller art window looking out where the work sits. I go around the work so many times trying to look through the window mostly failing to see what’s out there. But eventually I succeed in mapping the area. I slowly build the work. I try to feel my way through every inch of the surface. In fact, it’s much less than an inch. Sometimes a tiny dot might make a big difference, like a tiny sparkle in somebody’s eye that can make him come alive. But it gets complicated when the work doesn’t even have an eye or a face. It’s a very time consuming process. But when the work is done. It’s very obvious. I am at a special place only with my work and myself. Nothing else matters and I am completely at peace, or completely excited.

    So how do I go about it? My approach is to start from drawings. That’s my map to guide me to where I will be struggling. The lines, subtle shades of tones, shapes, these things can imply the vast process that I will be going through. I keep my sketchbook with me all the time. I try to brain storm on papers and come up with recurring shapes that literally ask me to work on as it starts to appear as a three dimensional piece in my imagination. Or sometime it just pops right on the page and I’m certain that I have to work on it.

    I started out as a painter so building structures can be rather crude with lots of trials and errors. I mostly use materials you can find at a hardware store: Wood, insulation foam, burlap, plaster, roofing tar, spray paint, and so on. And using newer, more exotic materials has been an interesting challenge today.

    The surface treatment brings up the characters of the piece, It defines the shape, it gives a static object movements, rhythm, surprises, and visual narratives. Or it can even tell you an imaginary history of a catastrophic event, reconciliation, or just endless calmness and richness of unbroken cycle of nature. I have fun going along with the flow. I take chances. I try to see things I didn’t see before. The result, when it works, always surprises me with a fresh presence of its own.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Solo Show in NYC 2013

    In News on

    It’s been 4 years since I showed a set of new works.  Finally I will have a solo show with new works this fall.  The show opens on 10/10/13 at Lori Bookstein Fine Art in NYC.  So far I’m planing to have 3 to 5 large pieces and probably around 4 midsize to smaller ones.  And possibly some small drawings as well…

    Pieces are still in progress… I still can’t see how the pieces fit in the space yet… But here is a floor plan of the space.

  • the lab magazine Interview

    In News on

    Here is a link to an interview with the lab magazine.  It went really well.  Please check it out!

    http://thelabmagazine.com/2013/05/09/hiroyuki-hamada/

  • Pechakucha Talk at Parrish

    In News on

    Following is a text from an event Pechakucha Night Hamptons Vol. 1 at Parrish Art Museum on Thursday, September 20, 2012.

    Thank you for inviting me today. I would like to talk about making sculptures. The first step is to come up with the basic idea for it. This is a tricky process because I am interested in an experience without words, stories or symbols. What I am interested in is to make you feel like you belong to the vast universe that is within the tiny cells we are made of reaching out to the edge of the space out there. It can be a scary feeling. You are all alone just floating in the unknown vastness. You might be stuck with something you don’t understand. Or you might feel like you are nothing. You might be lonely and afraid. But I believe good art can let you feel the vastness and the mystery without the fear. It welcomes you with open arms. And remind you that you belong to that reality. It can be a moment when you look at a painting you love. Or it can last for a whole song when you listen to a great song. Or it can last for a whole chapter of a book. What it does is that it can become a bridge between that part of you and you buried in our everyday life. It gives us the courage to go on and it gives us the courage to embrace the unknown with curiosity and excitement.

    Making process is a weird thing. You open yourself in certain ways at the same time you let go of other things. It’s not like solving a math problem where you add a fixed number to a fixed number for instance. Most of the time you can’t even see all the numbers you are adding. And the missing numbers can only be seen with your heart and soul. For an average man in mid 40s, jaded, cynical and disillusioned, it is not easy. As soon as I think I caught something, it’s gone. It’s like building something with my eyes closed. The things I can count on the most in this complicated process are persistence and time. Good work requires breaking rules that I have cultivated over the years. It requires additional trials and errors that allow me to see the new possibilities. I have to be patient in sticking to the goal.

    The process is very slow and it’s done with my tiny brain with yet smaller art window looking out where the work sits. I go around the work so many times trying to look through the window mostly failing to see what’s out there. But eventually I succeed in mapping the area. I slowly build the work. I try to feel my way through every inch of the surface. In fact, it’s much less than an inch. Sometimes a tiny dot might make a big difference, like a tiny sparkle in somebody’s eye that can make him come alive. But it gets complicated when the work doesn’t even have an eye or a face. It’s a very time consuming process. But when the work is done. It’s very obvious. I am at a special place only with my work and myself. Nothing else matters and I am completely at peace, or completely excited.

    So how do I go about it? My approach is to start from drawings. That’s my map to guide me to where I will be struggling. The lines, subtle shades of tones, shapes, these things can imply the vast process that I will be going through. I keep my sketchbook with me all the time. I try to brain storm on papers and come up with recurring shapes that literally ask me to work on as it starts to appear as a three dimensional piece in my imagination. Or sometime it just pops right on the page and I’m certain that I have to work on it.

    I started out as a painter so building structures can be rather crude with lots of trials and errors. I mostly use materials you can find at a hardware store: Wood, insulation foam, burlap, plaster, roofing tar, spray paint, and so on. And using newer, more exotic materials has been an interesting challenge today.

    The surface treatment brings up the characters of the piece, It defines the shape, it gives a static object movements, rhythm, surprises, and visual narratives. Or it can even tell you an imaginary history of a catastrophic event, reconciliation, or just endless calmness and richness of unbroken cycle of nature. I have fun going along with the flow. I take chances. I try to see things I didn’t see before. The result, when it works, always surprises me with a fresh presence of its own.

     

    Following images were shown during the talk–20 images, each shown for 20 seconds.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Pechakucha Night Hamptons Vol. 1 Thursday, September 20, 2012 – 6:00pm to 9:00pm